Paul Radin's Winnebago Notebooks

at the American Philosophical Society Library,
105 South Fifth Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106-3386

http://www.amphilsoc.org/

Accession Number, 497.3 R114

Compiled and crossed-referenced by Richard L. Dieterle

MMVI


Paul Radin
from American Anthropologist, 61 (1959)

This is a catalogue of the Winnebago notes and texts compiled by Paul Radin that are kept at the American Philosophical Society Library in Philadelphia.


Index

| Reel 8 | Radin's Winnebago Phonetic Stem Dictionary (The Radin Lexical File) | Winnebago I, #1 | Winnebago I, #2 | Winnebago I, #3 | Reel 9 | Winnebago I, #4 | Winnebago I, #5 | Winnebago I, #6 | Winnebago I, # 7a | Winnebago I, #7b | Winnebago I, #7c | Winnebago I, #7d | Winnebago I, #7e | Winnebago I, #7f | Winnebago I, #8 | Winnebago II, #1 | Winnebago II, #2 | Winnebago II, #3 | Winnebago II, #4 | Winnebago II, #5 | Reel 10 | Winnebago II, #6 | Winnebago II, #7 | Winnebago III, #1 | Winnebago III, #2 | Winnebago III, #3 | Winnebago III, #4 | Winnebago III, #5 | Winnebago III, #6 | Winnebago III, #7 | Winnebago III, #8 | Winnebago III, #9 | Winnebago III, #10 | Winnebago III, #11a | Winnebago III, 11b | Winnebago III, #12 | Reel 11 | Winnebago III, #13 | Winnebago III, #14 | Winnebago III, #15 | Winnebago III, #16 | Winnebago III, #17 | Winnebago III, #18 | Winnebago III, #19a | Winnbago III, #19b | Winnebago III, #19c | Winnebago III, #19d | Winnebago III, #19e | Winnebago IV, #1 | Winnebago IV, #2 | Winnebago IV, #3 | Winnebago IV, #4 | Winnebago IV, #5 | Winnebago IV, #6 | Winnebago IV, #7 | Winnebago IV, #8a | Winnebago IV, #8b-z | Winnebago IV, #9 | Reel 6b | Winnebago V, #1 | Winnebago V, #2 | Winnebago V, #3 | Winnebago V, #4 | Winnebago V, #5 | Winnebago V, #6 | Winnebago V, #7 | Winnebago V, #8 | Reel 6a | Winnebago V, #9 | Winnebago V, #10 | Winnebago V, #11 | Winnebago V, #12 | Winnebago V, #13 | Winnebago V, #14 | Winnebago V, #15 | Winnebago V, #16 | Winnebago V, #17 | Winnebago V, #18 | Winnebago V, #19 | Winnebago V, #20 | Winnebago V, #21 | Winnebago V, #22 | Winnebago V, #23 | Winnebago V, #24 | Reel 12 | Notebooks 1-19 | Reel 13 | Notebooks 20-52 | Reel 14 | Notebooks 53-79 | Sources |


Radin's Winnebago Phonetic Stem Dictionary (The Radin Lexical File)
Reel 8

With very few exceptions, all entries are made on 3 x 5 cards, most by hand, although some are typed. Almost all of it is published in Mary Carolyn Marino, A Dictionary of Winnebago: An Analysis and Reference Grammar of the Radin Lexical File (Ph.D. Thesis, University of California, Berkeley, December 14, 1968 [69-14,947]).

Alphabetical order: u, e, i, p, p', t', tc, k, k', x, x', 'a, 'e, 'i, 'o, 'u, d, g, m, n, s, s', z, w, y, r, gh, dj, c', j, undetermined. Apparently arranged by Dorothea Kaschube, March 28, 1974.


Winnebago I, #1
Freeman #3878
Reel 8

John Rave, paradigms.

John Rave's Peyote Experience. Very clear interlinear text. For another text, see Notebook 15.
1-46
Winnebago paradigms
1 page

Winnebago I, #2
Freeman #3884

Reel 8

A reprint of Paul Radin, "Personal Reminiscences of a Winnebago Indian," Journal of American Folk-Lore, 26, #102 (1913): 293-318. Contains the following stories with Winnebago phonetic text in footnotes at the bottom of each page: Earthmaker Blesses Wagíšega (Wešgíšega), Thunder Cloud is Blessed, Thunder Cloud Marries Again, The Story of the Thunder Names. For an incomplete handwritten text of Earthmaker Blesses Wagíšega, see Winnebago II, #3.


Winnebago I, #3
Freeman #3862
Reel 8

Winnebago ethnographic notes, myths, and some pages missing from other notebooks.

Thomas Clay, marriage rules
1
Mrs. Joseph LaMère, Annihilation of the Hočągara II (Hočąk version)
1-3
Mrs. Joseph LaMère, greetings in the old days
3
James Smith, The Man who Defied Disease Giver
3-6
Story about Lincoln and Mijistega (first page missing)
7-16
Anecdote about Young Rogue, the brother of Lincoln
16
Oliver LaMère, myths about Trickster used in homilies in the Native American Church (interlinear phonetic text). Published, WT 376-377.
17-25
     (α) Trickster and the Dancers (v. 2)
17-18
     (β) The Pointing Man (v. 2)
18-20
     (γ) Trickster's Anus Guards the Ducks (v. 2)
20-23
     (δ) Trickster Eats the Laxative Bulb (v. 2)
23-25
Fragment (in English only) of the translation from the missing half of the syllabic text to Turtle and the Merchant. For which, see Notebook 54.
26, ss 4-7
The English translation to pages 35-38 of a missing syllabic text of an incident in which a "demented fellow" [Turtle ?] tells of his war exploits at a wake for the dead.
27-28
Fragment (in English only) of Great Walker's Warpath. This is the missing page from Winnebago I, #7f.
29, ss 41-44
Robert Lincoln, The Annihilation of the Hočągara I (v. 1) (incomplete). For the last two pages of this story, see Notebook 61: 5-6.
30-33
Miscellaneous ethnographic notes on small paper
34-35
Notes from the fourth trip to the Winnebago, June-November, 1910
36 ff.
List of trips taken to the Winnebago
36
Material culture
36-38
Winnebago phonetic text, barely legible on a small sheet of paper
39
Notes on clans (principally the Elk Clan)
40-42
The buffalo hunt
43
Crimes
44
Charles Bonaparte, Nightspirit Songs
45, 48-51
John Johnson, Bear Clan funerary songs
46
Thunder Clan Songs
47
Sore Eye Dance Songs (they were in Potawatomi, and were not given)
52, 60
Blank paper with the following title: "Jasper Blowsnake's Account of How the Nights Blessed His Father".
53
John Johnson, Paint Dance Songs
54-55, 61-63
John Harrison, Grizzly Bear Songs
56
Sam Carley, Black Root Songs
57-59
Several words in syllabic script
64
John Johnson, Black Root Songs
65-66
Henry Johnson, Peyote Songs (none recorded, page is blank apart from title)
67
Buffalo Feast Songs
68-69
Bear Clan names (in syllabic script)
70
Origins of the Menominee [= Bear Clan Origin Myth (v. 2b)]
71
Role of the Thunder Clan in starting the fire
71
Bear Clan Origin Myth (incomplete) [= Bear Clan Origin Myth, V. 2a]
72
Sam Carley, Doctor Songs
73-74
Joseph LaMère, Wolf Clan Origins [= Wolf Clan Origin Myth, Version 4]
75-79
Joseph LaMère, story of the first great tribal lodge [= The Great Lodge]
79
Wolf Clan Songs (in syllabic script)
79
Notes on the Wolf Clan
100*
Personal names
101-102
Receipt from the Stechert Co. for Hegel's Phenomenologie.
103**
Page 16 from a myth (probably Wears White Feather)
104
Miscellaneous notes on clans
105
Origins of the Milky Way (continued on 107b)
105
Notes on the location of Waterspirits (?)
106
John Johnson, Waterspirit Songs
107
Origins of the Milky Way (continued from 105). Short notes on stars.
107b
Bear meat, preparation of corn
108
The hunt
109
Tom Big Bear, dog names
110-111
Bear Clan names, list of songs
112
Sam Blowsnake's Autobiography, handwritten in English
113-115
Role of the Bear Clan vis-a-vis the earth
90‡
Charley White (Buffalo Clan), Buffalo Clan Origin Myth
91-93
Buffalo Clan Songs (in syllabic script)
93
Notes on the Buffalo Clan
94-95
Quapah Origins
96
John Harrison, Paint Songs
75†
Sam Carley, songs for solo flute accompaniment
76
Nightspirit Songs
77
Brief notes on Christian influence
78
Bear Clan notes
79-80
Birth customs
81-82
Fasting
83
David Laury, Bear Clan Origin Myth [= Bear Clan Origin Myth (v. 3)]
84-88
David Laury, very short Snake Clan myth [= Snake Clan Origins]
88
Soldier Dance, fasting
89
Miscellaneous notes on myths
116††
Kinship, property, enemy war dead
117
Diagram of the Hokixere Lodge
118
Diagram of the Buffalo Dance Lodge
119
Diagram of the Grizzly Bear Lodge (with notes)
110‡
Hawk Clan Origin Myth (v. 2)
111v
Sore Eye Dance notes
111-112, 113
The warpath
112b
Claims made about previous lives by Thunder Cloud
114
Property, the warpath
115
Typed description of the ceremonies of the Peyote church
116-122
*new pagination begins here with the eightieth page being renumbered as 100.
**103 is filmed out of order after p. 100.
†what should have been page 97 is now numbered as page 77. This causes duplication of page numbers.
††what should have been page 90 has been renumbered as page 116.
‡what should have been page 120 is now renumbered as page 110, causing duplication of page numbers.

Winnebago I, #4
Freeman #2058
Reel 9

Is there a substratum language in America? Outline of a thesis in the affirmative. 31 pages.

Preliminary Plan.
1-3, 5
Languages that have Traits of I (Athapascan)
4
Languages that have Traits of II (Algonkin)
4
Types of Linguistic Structure (dated as March 5, 1933).
7-8
Prime (?)
9
Languages that have Traits of III (Substratum)
10-12
Distribution of Algonkin
13
Distribution of Substratum Language
14
Distribution of Athapascan Proper
15
2d Language — Athapascan
16
1st Language — the Substratum Language
17
3d Language — Algonkin
18
Miscellaneous Notes.
19-20
Some Possible Inferences
21
I. Proto-N. American
22
II. Pacific Coast Group
22
Jaltianguis (?)
23
A left column with a list of page numbers correlated with Spanish language place names in the right column
23v
Linguistic Groups of Mexico, etc.
24-26
Linguistic H[eritage ?]
27-28
Linguistic Groups of Mexico, etc.
29
Aboriginal History of N. A. For more on this topic, see Winnebago I, #8.
30-31

Winnebago I, #5
Freeman #3863
Reel 9

Winnebago history, transcriptions from the Wisconsin Historical Collections (see Winnebago I, #6). Most of this material is typed.

Story of first Sauk-Fox War [see The First Fox and Sauk War].
Wisconsin Historical Collections, I.86-93
1-7
Mention of a picture of Winnesheek (1829)
Wisc. Hist. Coll. I.11
7
Yellow Thunder, character of Winnebago, opposition to whites
Wisc. Hist. Coll. I.73-76
7-10
Villages before 1828, construction of Ft. Winnebago mentioned in passing
Wisc. Hist. Coll. I.101
10-11
Col. Miller's encounter with Winnebago.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. I.52
11-12
Meeting with an old Winnebago whose band had been wiped out.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. I.86-87
12-13
Lake Winnebago takes its name from the tribe.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. I.114
13
Canadian met with who had a Winnebago wife. They fixed the white people a kind of muskrat pot pie, which was very good.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. I.143-144
13-14
"Green Bay in 1726." Letter translated from the French. "Memoir concerning the peace made by Monsieur de Lignery with the Chiefs of the Foxes (Renards), Sauks (Sakis), and Winnebagoes (Puans a la Baie), June 7, 1726."
Wisc. Hist. Coll. I.21-23
14-17
Winnebago War at Galena. Blackhawk War.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. I.95-100
17-22
Mention of original inhabitants of Wisconsin.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.79
23
The Decora family.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.177-178
23-25
Mr. Burnett's reports to the authorities concerning the disposition of the Winnebago prior to Blackhawk's War. Correspondence on the course of the campaign; orders to Mr. Burnett respecting what information and instructions he was to convey to the Winnebago. Report of Mr. Burnett to Gen. Street. Capture of Blackhawk.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.252-262
25-33
An account of how a certain Mr. Williams induced the Winnebago and Menominee to give a small cession of land to the Not-ta-ways (Iroquois) for a price (1821). How the Iroquois negatively reacted to the suggestion that they move west to Wisconsin. After celebrations some time later, the Menominee, in the absence of many of their chiefs, were induced to make a huge cession of land to the New York Indians at a trifling price.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.424-428
33-38
The character of the Menominees. Their chief Tomah and how he helped save the British in the Pontiac War. The Decorah family.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.176-177
38-40
The collection of pelts from various tribes.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.131
40
An account of the Redbird uprising, 1826-1827.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.153-168
40-53
Winnebago hostility towards the saw mill built in 1820 by W. Owens.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.117-118
53-54
Winnebagoes kill several white families in 1830.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.241
54
Troubles with the Winnebago around Prairie du Chien, 1827.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.329-331
54-56
A report of an attempt to raise Winnebago warriors to fight against Blackhawk.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.283-284
56-57
White Crow retrieves the two Hall sisters from the Sauks for a ransom. White Crow told Capt. Gratiot that the Sauk and Fox would kill all the whites, "as they were a soft-shelled breed; that when the spear was put to them they would quack like ducks ..." White Crow and others held hostage to insure good behavior of the Winnebagoes.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.338-340
58-60
Indians recruited as scouts against Blackhawk. Miraculous escape of Spencer. His subsequent PTSD. Death of Lt. Force & Mr. Green at hands of the Winnebago.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.349-351
60-62
Black Hawk abandons a strong position. Capt. Dunn shot by his own sentry. Winnebagoes used as scouts, Poquette is the translator. The pursuit closes in. A Winnebago scout shoots a Sauk. At one point the scouts are chased back to the main body of troops and general contact is made. During the engagement, Gen. Henry orders a charge. The casualties among the Sauk were great. The Winnebagoes and Poquette leave after the battle. During the night, an Indian yells at the whites from an eminence above their encampment. His motives are misunderstood since no one was there to translate. The Sauk's peace offering was mistaken for an harangue to his warriors for a night attack.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.354-360
62-70
On July 1, 1832, Gen. Atkinson's command marched to Lake Koskonong. Twenty Winnebagoes were under the command of Gen. Dodge. White Crow later joined them with an addition 30 Winnebago warriors. The Winnebago acted as scout ahead of the column. They were honorable and patriotic, contrary to the false story circulated by Maj. McConnell.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.404-407
70-74
During Dodge's charge against the Sauk, the Winnebago scouts mostly took cover to fire from concealment, but Poquette and Chief White Crow joined the ranks of the whites and fought in the open.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.409-410
74-75
An Indian school was set up in 1832 for the Winnebago and Rev. Lowry was appointed superintendent at Prairie du Chien. A year later buildings were erected for it on the Yellow River in Iowa.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.146
75-76
Orders to Rev. Lowry from Gen. Street authorizing provisions for the Winnebagoes in connection with the Indian school.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.237
76
When the first mill was built in western Wisconsin, a large band of starving Winnebago descended upon it and asked for provisions. The miller went to get more, but when he returned, he found his mill burned to the ground.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. II.230
76-77
What the Winnebago were called by other tribes. Their annihilation by the Illinois. Unlikelihood of this account. Population numbers.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.136-137
78-79
The name given the Winnebago. Wars with Illinois. The De Kaurys. Car-ry-mau-nee. Pe-sheu, Sarcel (the Teal), Sau-sa-mau-nee, Four Legs, Black Wolf, Sar-ro-chau. Various white traders and agents associated with the Winnebago, particularly at Portage.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.285-290
79-86
The Chippeways.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.132
86-87
How the Winnebago defeated the Ottawa at Maniste River and took their chief prisoner.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.203-204
87
A list of all the tribes (26) that at any time had lived in Wisconsin.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.126
87
Antiquities of the Rock River area, including a bird shaped stone revered by the Winnebago.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.191
88
Captives and slaves.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.256
88
The peace made by De Lignery with the Fox, Sauks, and Winnebago on June 7, 1726. The problem posed to the French by the Fox. Advise to induce the Illinois to free Fox prisoners. De Lignery speech to the Indians on June 7. Reply made by the Fox. Reply of the Sauks. Reply of the Winnebago. Letter from De Lignery to De Siette (Commanding among the Illinois), June 19, 1726. Extracts of a letter of De Longueil to the Minister of the Colonial Government (Quebec, July 25, 1726).
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.148-159
88-101*
Menominees at New London.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.478
101
The Shawnee Prophet tells the Menominee and Winnebago not to give white people meat. As a result, Louis Bauprez (1810-11) nearly starved to death. The British use Menominees and Winnebagoes to help capture Mackinaw from the Americans in 1812. Menominee and Winnebago with the British in 1813. The attack and reduction of the fort at Prairie du Chien in which the Winnebago aided the British.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.268-279
101-112
Mention of assembling Indian forces to attack British colonies in 1755.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.212
113
The French effort to raise Indian forces to fight the British in the Revolutionary War.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.229
113-114
The murder of a trader, Mr. Ace, by the Winnebago.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.263-264
114-115
Townsend, lead mines, and the Winnebago War of 1827.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.60-61
115
Mr. Sterling and the relocation of some Winnebago in 1838.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. III.51
115-116
Winnebago bring the war-wampum to the Potawatomi. The Winnebagoes murder some members of two families. Col. Whistler mobilizes a company. The author is officer of the guard. He meets the Winnebago who are singing their death songs. Description of Red Bird, and his surrender.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.171-176
117-120
Winnebago give permission for Stockbridge Indians to be employed making shingles in their territory.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.176
120
Robert Irwin as agent of the Winnebago.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.165
120
Ft. Winnebago built and Winnebago cession
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.183
120
Purchase of Winnebago and Menominee lands in 1831-1832. Black Hawk sends invitations to other tribes to fight the whites. Fear of a general war.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.212-213
120-121
Distribution of land among the various tribes. Differences between the Menominee and Winnebago. The Winnebago described as treacherous, cruel, deceitful, thievish, and misleading.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.216-217
121-123
The Winnebago are "only a tithe of the strength" they were formerly.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.218
123
Origins of the name "Winnebago". The Algonquians call the Winnebago a "Dakotah tribe", but the affinity is doubted. Early mention of the Winnebago. The idea that the Winnebago came from Mexico. A Winnebago chief describes a fight against the Spaniards.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.233-236
123-126
When the Sauks and Fox left, the Winnebago occupied their lands.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.242
126
In 1813, the British under Dixon gathered together a number of tribes including the Winnebago and promised that they could plunder the "cowardly" Yankees. This force was defeated at Sandusky and only half returned home alive. The 1825 treaty among the northwest Indians settled their boundaries with the exception of the Menominee. Anishinaabeg lands claimed by the Sioux were retained by the former through right of conquest.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.243-246
127-129
The Winnebago outbreak attributed to the expansion of the lead mines in 1826.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.250
129-130
The land sale to the Iroquois who settled around the Green Bay area in 1827. They were almost cheated out of their small reservations.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.295-297
130-131
The problems of the Stockbridge tribe in Indiana and Wisconsin, 1818-1822.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.327-328
131-133
The Winnebago were friendly in the area around Four Lakes. They were able to grow bumper crops of corn, 1831-1833.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.344
133-134
The remarkable population explosion of white settlers around the lake region from 1837-1860.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.377-378
134
The Winnebago abused the first settler of Monroe County in 1850, eating his food and sleeping in his bed. When some Indians abused Mr. McMahon in 1853, he went to Sparta and raised a vigilante posse. They captured everybody in the nearby Indian village, after which McMahon singled out the chief perpetrator and whipped him with a rawhide. However, the complete indifference that the Indian showed to pain excited the admiration of the crowd.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. IV.387-389
135-137
A number of events in early Wisconsin are fruitful subjects of historical investigation.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.10
138
Father Crespel relates an expedition (no year given) in which the lodges and corn of the Puants was burned.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.90
138
A letter of 1728 to the French minister of war relating an expedition against the Fox. Some prisoners, including two Puants with the Fox were turned over to the Indian allies and burned alive. The abandoned villages and fields of the Fox and Puants were burned. However, the French had to burn one of their abandoned forts less it fall into the hands of the enemy and be used against the Folles Avoines.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.92-93
138-141
Description of the burial of a Winnebago brave at Butte des Morts.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.96
141
The Indian allies of the French fall upon the Fox and kill over 300 of them, men, women, and children.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.104
141-142
The virtues of de Lignery.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.113
142
The achievements of the army of Indian allies (including the Winnebago) under the command of Marin in 1756-1757.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.117
142-143
The tragic murder and mutilation of the Methode family by the Winnebago on the Yellow River. The perpetrators were found out and a militia surrounded the nearest Winnebago village and arrested one of them. Chief De Koray went to the whites and pleaded for mercy on behalf of the captive, citing liquor as the cause of their misconduct. He told them that if they hanged the men, they would likely be avenged two-for-one. A digression on frontier crimes and rough justice. Two Winnebago chiefs were held by the army until the tribe turned over the other murderers.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.126-129
143-147
The supposed Mexican origins of the Winnebago and Dakotah. "These people have more courage, and more national character, than any tribe of the North West." When they joined Tecumseh they lost 60 of their best warriors at Tippecanoe. A description of the spirit of vengeance among the Winnebago and the practice of wearing a human hand on the breast. The Dakotah, who had grievances of their own, induced Red Bird of the Winnebago to seek vengeance against the whites. The attack on Gagnier (who was black) and his family. The Indians celebrate all night with whiskey. They discovered two keel boats returning from Ft. Snelling, and thinking them unarmed, decided to attack them. A detailed description of the attack. The subsequent arrival of Gen. Atkinson and the surrender of Red Bird. A Winnebago delegation to Washington secured the pardon of their men from Pres. Adams. The honor and faithfulness of Chief De Kauray is described. Governor Cass' account of the uprising. The letter of Gen. Dodge to Gen. Atkinson (1826).
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.141-158
147-167
The Winnebago War by Col. Thomas McKenney. Seven Winnebago warriors on the way to Four Lakes were intercepted and detained. The next day three Winnebagoes in turn came with the same message: the next day Red Bird and Wika would surrender themselves. The next day the two showed up under flag of true singing their death songs. Two scalp yells were given which brought the Menominee to their feet. Nąka, also known as Keramani, asked that they not be placed in chains. A very detailed description of Red Bird's costume. The nobility of Red Bird. The negative impression conveyed by Wika. A discussion of the rattlesnakes that infest the area and what the Indians do for protection against them. Descent of the Wisconsin River. Pierre Pacquette, interpreter. The beauty of the Wisconsin River, more so than the Fox. McKenney meets with Winnebagoes who suddenly appear armed on the bluff. They have a cordial meeting. He takes two of them with him for the rest of the voyage. Meeting with Gen. Atkinson. The romantic character of moonlight on the Wisconsin River. Prairie du Chien — the dilapidated character of the houses there. McKenney sees the site of the murder of Gagnier and gives an account of it. Descent of the Mississippi, and visit to the grave of Du Buque. Lead mines at Galena.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.178-204
167-203
Landing at Lake Peoria. They meet "Indians from whom we learned that it was more than 200 miles to the nearest trading post on the lake, which was Chi-ca-a-go." Meeting with Black Hawk.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.216
203-204
During the Winnebago outbreak, every settler had his rifle as a constant companion.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.226-227
204-205
Canoe trip down the Fox River to Lake Winnebago, thence to the Mississippi River.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.234-235
205-206
In 1848 the Winnebago were scattered along the Wisconsin and Fox Rivers, through the Kickapoo Timbers, and the Lemonweir Valley. They were to be removed to Iowa.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.279
206
Poor success in removing the Winnebago in 1848. ( Letter mentioned is not in the notebook.)
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.280-283
206
*there is no page numbered 96, the numeral being skipped.

Radin Notebooks, Winnebago I, #6
Freeman #3863

Reel 9

Winnebago history, transcriptions (see Winnebago I, #5). Wisconsin Historical Collections, Vols. VI, VII, and XI are handwritten, the rest are typescripts. The handwritten material was done by a researcher only identified by the initials "J.N.M."

Papers of T. G. Anderson, British Indian Agent. An order authorizing requisitions from G. H. Monk.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. X.142
1
Winnebagoes at the Peace of 1814. At a conference called at Mackinaw on June 3, 1815, the words of Black Wolf (called "Sausamani"), a Winnebago chief, are recorded as he spoke to Lt. Co. MacDouall and others representing the British government. Black Wolf describes the Big Knives as the tribe's "inveterate enemy" and "bad people". He fears that with the abandonment of the fort, the Big Knives will exterminate them. On the 7th of June he describes his tribe as "a turbulent set" and says "our enemies always feel the weight of our anger." He makes a request for clothing and liquor.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. X.142-145
1-5
Notes on early exploration by Edward D. Neill. An account of the journeys of Peter Radisson from a then recently discovered MS in the British Museum. Visit to central Wisconsin, 1659-1660. His expedition of 1662. Visit to the village of the Huron refugees. Radisson is adopted by the Menominees. Visit to the Sioux. Later visit to England and to Boston, Mass. Invitation to visit the Potawatomies, which they effected in 1665. Du Luth and Perrot in the 1680's. Meeting with the Ioway. The Miamis give Perrot lead ore. War with the Fox in 1728 and 1730. Problems with the Sioux. The activities of Marin and his son in the 1750's.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. X.292-306
5-24
Some Wisconsin Indian Conveyances, 1793-1836. The description of the grant of lands to the Stockbridge and Munsee tribes, a land bordering on the Winnebago and Menominee. List of signatories.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XV.6-7
25-27
Sketch of Cutting Marsh. Rev. Marsh was made pastor to the Stockbridge tribe in 1829. On a mission of exploration in 1832, he encountered the Winnebago on Doty Island. Removal of the Stockbridge to the east shore of Lake Winnebago.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XV.7-31
27-32
Documents relating to the Stockbridge Mission, 1825-1848. The objectives of the mission, including the Christianizing of the Winnebago and Menominee. Journal entries by date. Fear of the Winnebago. Winnebago kill 8 white men. Sauk alleged to have eaten a white man's heart. A Winnebagoes warparty passes by the mission. A description of their dress. "Their behavior was perfectly civil ..." A warparty of Menominee pass by on their way against the Sauks. A description of their songs.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XV.39-65
32-40
Expedition to the Sacs and Foxes by Enos Cutler (1835). The Winnebagoes on the Fox River were encountered and described as "pitiful and wretched". Indolence, alcoholism and theft are rampant. They are banned from going down the Fox River, which was ceded. The Rock River band refuses to leave, and the use of force to remove them is contemplated. Travel to the village where the Winnebago Prophet came from. Winnebagoes live alongside the Fox in 12 lodges. The Winnebagoes are "thievish and troublesome" to the Fox. Cutler meets the Winnebago Prophet whose demeanor expressed, "humbled pride and disappointed hope." Sauks are constantly at war with the Sioux, and are more warlike than the latter. They also fight the Winnebago.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XV.105-107, 124-127
41-45
Reminiscences of Life in Territorial Wisconsin, by Elisabeth Therese Baird. Arrival at the village of Four Legs where the town of Oshkosh now stands. The hostility of the Indians there. They are held up for bread and flour. Arrival at Prairie du Chien. Sounds of battle in the distance. Victorious Indians stop by later for "fire water". On the return journey they are held up again for bread and flour.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XV.228-233
46-48
Alfred Branson's account of a horseback ride into Wisconsin, 1835. An account of early Prairie du Chien. Population is a mixture of French and Indians.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XV.284-285
48-50
Pioneering in the Wisconsin lead region, by Theodore Rodolf. Description of the settlers in the Puckatonica area. Bands of Winnebago pass by, and are feared on account of the recent Black Hawk War, but people soon become used to their presence.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XV.356
50
Report on the Quality and Condition of Wisconsin Territory, by Samuel Stambaugh (1831). Description of the boundaries of the territories of the Menominee and the Winnebago. The area between Fond du Lac River and the Fox River up to Lake Winnebago is Winnebago territory. "I am induced to think that [this tract] is of very little importance to this Tribe; and if their title was extinguished by the United States, ... the government would have the disposal of the whole country ..."
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XV.421-433
50-52
Narrative of Louis B. Porlier. Some say that Chaetar and One-Eyed Decorrah were said to have captured Black Hawk, but according to a personal account given him by Grignon, Black Hawk surrendered to him as a friend. An account of the principal Menominee villages. In early times a high ranking Menominee would not marry a Winnebago.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XV.442-445
52-55
The capture of Mackinaw (1763), a Menominee account. Shononee relates how removal had exposed Indian tribes to dangers. He quotes Pontiac at great length to show that he had foreseen all this.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XV.228
56-57
The Indian Wars of Wisconsin, by Moses M. Strong. The treaty among the Indians made a Green Bay in 1726 by De Lignery, did not hold. In 1825 another peace was made which included the Winnebago. In 1826 Fort Crawford was abandoned and its troops redeployed to Ft. Snelling. The Winnebago thought this redeployment was out of fear of them. In 1827 a party of Winnebagoes massacred an entire family of whites. Later that year a false rumor circulated among the Winnebago that two of their prisoners in the hands of the whites had been remanded to an Anishinaabe gauntlet with fatal effects, so one of their chiefs was called upon to take revenge. Red Bird and others killed Gagnier and another white man. The Winnebago ambush a keel boat and fierce combat ensues. Militia is raised. Col. Snelling leaves Ft. Snelling with two companies of infantry. Panic in the Galena area. The lead miners form a company under the command of Col. Dodge. Erection of Ft. Winnebago. Surrender of Red Bird. A description of Red Bird. What was said at his surrender. Pacification of the Winnebago. The result caused a rush of settlement.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VIII.244, 252-265
57-73*
Reminiscences of the North-west, by Mary Ann Brevoort Bristol. The dress of the various Indian tribes.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VIII.304
76
Early Times at Fort Winnebago and Black Hawk War Reminiscences, by Satterlee Clark. The 5th Infantry built Ft. Winnebago at Portage in 1828 to prevent the Winnebago from levying tolls on the fur companies. Pauquette and Clark help prevent the Winnebago from selling their lands. How Pauquette, drunk, was killed by Iron Walker (Mązemaniga).
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VIII.309, 318-319
76-77
Recollections of Rev. Eleazer Williams. The attempt to move the New York Indians was not well received by them, although their representative made it seem so. The Winnebago and Menominee gave them a very small tract of land. In the end, the War Dept. decided against the scheme.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VIII.334-341
77-82
The Early Exploration and Settlement of Juneau Co., by J. T. Kingston. In 1836 at the Treaty of Ft. Winnebago, the Winnebago ceded lands south of the Lemonweir River and East of the Wisconsin River. These were explored and settled by lumbermen.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VIII.340, 407
82
Papers from the Canadian Archives — Number of Indians Resorting to Michillimakinac, Sept. 10, 1782. Listed among the tribes are 150 "Winipegos".
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XII.60
83
Memoranda Relative to the Indian Trade (Canadian Archives). Among the tribes at war are listed the "Winipigoes or picants", who are said to number 600 men. A plan is put forward to induce a peace settlement in order to facilitate the fur trade. Interpreters nominated and gifts of wampum belts suggested.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XII.78-82
84-86
Ainsee's Expedition to Wisconsin and Minnesota (1787). He went to Green Bay with a canoe full of presents, some of which he distributed to the Menominee. At Portage he gave gifts to the Winnebago. In the lists of village that he visited, he lists, "The village of the Puants altogether, 304 men."
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XII.84-85, 90
86-87
Lt. Col. M'Kay to Col. M'Douall (Canadian Archives). Mentions that Puants did not use the powder that they obtained at Mackilimackinac.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XII.115-116
88
Robert Dickson the Indian Trader, by Earnest A. Cruikshank. Dickson, in 1812, prepares an Indian force including Winnebagoes, to hold Ft. Mackinac. The Potawatomies were hostile to the British, but the Menominee and Winnebago were "as warmly attached to him as ever." In 1814 delegates from the Sioux, Menominee, and Winnebago met in Quebec with the British. Americans from St. Louis capture Prairie du Chien. The British, with Dickson participating, retook Prairie du Chien.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XII.139-153
89-94
Missions on Chiquemon Bay, by John N. Davidson. The discovery of the bay by Radisson. Missions established there, first headed by Father Allouez. Seven Indian nations gathered there to secure themselves from the Iroquois threat in the east and the Sioux threat in the west. In Sept. 1669, Marquette headed the mission. Founding of La Pointe.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XII.434-441
95-102
The French Regime in Wisconsin, I. Jean Nicollet's 1634 visit to Wisconsin. 1650-1660: the tribes and their wars. At Green Bay live the Sakis, Pouteouatomis, Malhominis, and the Puans. An unflattering portrait of the Puans. Their treachery to the Ottawa ambassadors. They concentrate in one village and are beset by disease. They attempt to attack the Outagamies with a force of 500 men, but all are lost in a storm on Lake Michigan. The Puans are afflicted with famine. The Islinois take pity on them and send an embassy of 50 of their best people. These are massacred and eaten. In a revenge expedition, the Islinois kill, wound, or capture all the Puans except one. Later the captives were released to repopulate their country. The virtues of the Winnebago. Their haughtiness. Their protection by the French. "Some years ago, the Outagamies, Maskoutech, Kikabous, Sakis, and Miamis were almost defeated by them."
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.1-7
103-111
The French Regime in Wisconsin, 1665-1666. The Maskoutech, Kikabous, and Miamis had gone south to escape the Iroquois.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.41
111-112
The Jesuit mission (1669-1670). Allouez regarded as a Manitou by the Mascouten on the Fox River. As he arrives in Green Bay he is well received by the Menominees and Winnebago, both tribes having been decimated not long before.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.65-68
112-113
Jesuit missions (1673-1675). In the Green Bay area, Allouez converts 400-500 to Christianity. In a war between the Winnebago and the Sioux, the Iowa (who speak the former's language) are neutral.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.94
113-114
Perrot and the Wisconsin tribes (1690-1691). The Chief of the Winnebago allies himself with a force brought by Perrot consisting of Iroquois, Abenaquis, Nepicireniens, and 600 French troops. The Winnebago chief communicates to the Outagamies Perrot's resolve to punish them. The Outagamies engage in war with the Sioux and losses are great on both sides. The Outaouaks launch warparties with the Islinois as their allies, against the Sioux, Osage, and Kancas. The speech of Perrot to the Cinagots and the Outaouaks. One war chief still wanted to go to battle with the Sioux, so the Puans attempted to placate him with gifts.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.143-160
114-120
Le Sueur's voyage up the Mississippi (1700). Le Sueur meets five Canadians who have been beaten up by a warparty going against the Sioux. There were 90 Indians from the Outagamies, Saquis, Poutouatamis, and Puans.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.181
120
Letter of Father Marest to Gov. Vaudreuil, June 21, 1712. The attack on Detroit. The enormous casualties of the Fox and Mascouten. However, there are surviving Fox warriors in the Green Bay region with allies among the Kickapoos, Sauks, and Puans.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.288-289
121-122
Proceedings of the French Council of Marine, 1716. To achieve peace with the Renards, the prisoners taken at Detroit must be returned to them.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.340
122-123
Memoir on the Savages of Canada, 1718. La Baye is settled by the Puans and Foiles-avoines with the Saquis nearby. The Puans and Foiles-avoines number only 80-100 men each.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.371
123-124
Charlevoix Visits Wisconsin, 1712. At the mouth of the Baye of Puans dwell the Pouteouatamis and the Noquets. At the end of the Baye are the Sakis, Malomonis, and the Otchangras. A description of the Malhominis. The Otchangras used to live at Green Bay before they were attacked by the Islinois, but now live by another lake. When they attempted to avenge themselves upon the Islinois they lost 600 men on Lake Michigan to a gale. The Otchangra have now settled near the French fort on the Fox River. Their language is different from the Sakis. An account of a Spanish attempt to enter the Illinois country by force. They overran an Aiouez village, but were in turn ambushed and rubbed out. Artefacts from a dead Spanish chaplain were shown to the French by a Puan. A calumet dance was given. "The Otchangras ... exhibited an extraordinary agility; they are also better built and more agile than the Sakis."
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.408-416
124-129
Intertribal affairs, 1723. In a war against the Islinois, the Renards allied themselves with the Puans, Sakis, Kicapous, Sioux, and Mascoutens. The Sauteurs are continually at war with the Renards.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.416
129-130
De Lignery at Green Bay, 1724. Letter from De Lignery to Broisbriant. An account of the peace made between the Fox and the Anishinaabe. They exchange captives.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.444-445
130
Peace made with the Renards (June 7, 1726). Sieur de Lignery urged the Renards, Sakis, and Puans to lay down their clubs which they had raised against the Islinois. It is suggested that there be an exchange of captives. Later there is to be a meeting in Montreal with chiefs from the Renards, Sakis, Puants, Kikapous, Mascoutins, and Sioux.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XVI.463-466
131-132
Events at Prairie du Chien Previous to American Occupation, 1814, by Alfred E. Bulger. Americans build Ft. Shelby. Eight Winnebago are captured, and while they are being fed, seven of them were murdered, the eighth having escaped. British Col. Robert McDouall, commandant at Mackinaw, prepared an expedition to take Ft. Shelby. His forces consisted in part of Sioux and Winnebago. Maj. McKay not pleased with the performance of his Indian allies, but McDouall sends a letter to Capt. Bulger telling him to lavish praise upon them. Letter detailing widespread starvation among the Indians. The British are not able to supply corn to everyone. Capt. Bulger expresses satisfaction of the British to the Folles-Avoines and Winnebago who agree to help the British in any way they can. Dog Head, a Winnebago chief, described as, "a worthless fellow & [having] very little influence". McDouall's speech to the Indians given in full. He reviews the hostile acts of the Big Knives against the Indians, and how their Father the King had attempted to secure their interests. The war is portrayed as being on their account. Because the Big Knives have interrupted the supply lines from Quebec, it will be necessary for the Indians to supply 80-100 warriors for a campaign. In a letter, McDouall advises Bulger on lines of retreat if necessary, and on relying upon the Folles-Avoines and Winnebago. Bulger's order to Lt. Lawe to bring 150 select Follesavoines and Winnebago warriors to the defense of Mackinac (March, 1815).
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.9-11
133-143
Papers of James Duane Doty, Official Journal, 1820. Letter to James Strong, Chairman of the Comt. on Territories. "A few remarks upon the state of the Savages in that region ..." About 24,000 Indians reside in the territory of the Cippewau, Munnomonee, Winnebaygo, Ottauwau and Pootowotomee tribes. There is a need for a superintendent. Increase in settlement would promote the security of this frontier. The Winnebaygoes sell a lot of corn raised near the Wiskonsin Portage to the market at Green Bay. Thus it is a good place for settlement.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.12-14
144-146
Notes on Early Lead Mining in the Fever (or Galena) River Region, by the editor. Indians used buck horns and heating a cooling with fire and water to break up the rock. Women and old men did the mining, the younger men did the smelting. The Winnebago took over the mines from the Sauk and Fox after the treaty of 1804. The Fox, Sacs, and Iowas spent more time mining than hunting, and in 1810 produced 400,000 lbs. of lead.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.14-16
146-148
The Arrival of American Troops at Green Bay in 1816. Letter of Dr. William Henry Hening, regimental surgeon. A new fort will be erected on the site of the old French fort at Green Bay. Two tribes lived in the area in the time of the French: the Menominee and the Winnebago. The latter were driven to Lake Winnebago and the Rock River region. The Winnebagoes strongly oppose any settlement in their area. "The storm is murmuring at a distance, which I am fearful will, sooner or later, burst on us with all the accumulated horrors of savage vengeance." Hening encloses a speech of Nat-aw-pin-daw-qua, or the Smoker, a Winnebago chief, delivered Aug. 23, 1816 to the Indian Agent Boyer. He is apprehensive that the whites are building forts because they intend harm to the Red Skins. However, they will not succeed, because God protects the Indians as well. However, despite the lies told about the Winnebago, they are desirous of friendship. He renounces allegiance to the Red Coats, but relates the perfidy of American agents. Nevertheless, he asks for American rifles, which are the best. He hopes that the Father will give him of his milk (whiskey), and they promise to carry back to their villages and not drink it all on the way back, as others have done.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.16-21
148-153
Narrative of Spoon Decorah. Interview by Rueben Thwaites, conducted March 29, 1887. Brief review of his father and the wars in which his relatives participated. Recounts how he was pro-American in the Winnebago and Black Hawk wars. The Black Hawk War: participation of Pierre Paquette, Winnebagoes who fought with the whites, fear of retaliation by the Sacs. Account of the capture of Black Hawk. Big Canoe (One-Eyed Decorah) went to see Black Hawk because he was the only one who could speak Sac. Black Hawk surrendered to Big Canoe. Recollections of Karrymaunee, his father-in-law. Move to Iowa. Winnebago balk at moving to Minnesota to neighbor the Sioux. Near incident with U. S. soldiers, who were on edge. Decorah released to live in Wisconsin with his band. An account of the traditions of his people. Conflict with the whites over the lead mines. Brief accounts of Black Wolf, Kerrymaunee, Snake Skin, Grizzly Bear, Joseph Crelie, Bad Spirit Killer, Capt. Low, and Major Twiggs. The decline of the Winnebagoes. The Winnebagoes do not want to live on reservations.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.22-40
154-172
     First Contact (v. 2)
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.33-34
165-166
     Tecumseh's Bullet Proof Skin
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.35-36
167-168
Narrative of Walking Cloud. Interview by Rueben Thwaites, conducted May 18, 1887. After a mention of his origins and family, he gives an account of the Black Hawk War. His father, also named "Black Hawk", participated in the war. It was his father's band who found the Sac Black Hawk and persuaded him to surrender, not One-Eyed Decorah, a man of bad morals. Walking Cloud and his people returned to Wisconsin from both Minnesota and Nebraska. Friends and enemies of the Winnebago. An account of some of the religious beliefs of the tribe.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.41-45**
173-178
     First Contact (v. 3)
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.44
177
     Waterspirits Keep the Corn Fields Wet
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.45
178
     Journey to Spiritland, v. 7
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XIII.45
178
"Jonathan Carver and Carver's Grant" by D. S. Duvie. An assessment of Carver's account of the Winnebago queen, Glory of the Morning. Confirmed by Winnebago tradition still extant. Her native name was Ho-po-ko-e-aw. Married to a Frenchman named de Kaury, mortally wounded April 28, 1760 at Quebec. Further citations given. The island to which Carver refers is probably Doty Island.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VI.224-225
179‡
T. Forogth., "Journal of a Voyage ... (1819)." Capt. Whistler and a trader were fired on by the Winnebago.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VI.219
180
M. Meeber, "Early History of the Lead Region in Wisconsin." An account of Old Buck who discovered and mined the lead of this region.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VI.281-282
181
S. C. Draper, "Michael St. Cyr and Early Dane County Pioneers". Survey of the city of Four Lakes.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VI.399
182
Joseph Tasse, "Memoir of Charles de Langlade". Quotes Relations des Jesuites, 1698. New fresh water sea on whose shore the inhabitants speak a language neither Huron nor Algonquian. Called les Puants, short for "the people of l'eau puante", of the putrid water, since they came from the shores of a northern salt sea.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VII.126
183
Tasse, "Memoir of Charles de Langlade". Grand council held in Montreal of the Sioux, Sacs, Foxes, Menominees, Winnbagoes, Ottawas, and Chippewas. Discourse conducted in Chippewa. (No date or context given for this.)
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VII.167
184
A. G. Ellis, "Fifty-Four Years Recollection of Men and Events in Wisconsin". Winnebago and Menominee land session. (No context given.)
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VII.214
185
A. G. Ellis, "Fifty-Four Years Recollection of Men and Events in Wisconsin". Solomon Hendricks, chief of the Stockbridge Indians, made a speech to the assembled Winnebago and Menominee, and gave out gifts. "First they [the Winnebago] gave the pipe dance, an amusing affair, a single one dancing at a time, the trick of which seemed to be to keep time to the drum, and especially to suspend action instantaneously with the cessation of the instrument — the dancer to remain in the exact attitude in which the cessation of the drum caught him; frequently the attitude was ridiculous in the extreme ..." The was followed by the beggar's dance done for charity. "The whole concluded with the war dance, a sight to test the nerves of the stoutest heart." War dance described (see Glossary).
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VII.223-225
186-188

"Fur Trade and Factory System at Green Bay, 1816-1821". Three incidents of whites being fired on by Indians.

Wisc. Hist. Coll. VII.279
189
J. T. Kingston, "Early Western Days". In 1827, some incidents near Prairie du Chien caused the army to be called out. About a dozen people killed.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. VII.316
190
"Jean Nicolet, Interpreter and Voyageur in Canada, 1618-1642". Champlain had heard of a tribe to the west called "the Tribe of the Men of the Sea" (Winnebago), and to their west, another tribe with wooden boats who resembled the Tartars or Chinese.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.11
191
"Jean Nicolet, Interpreter and Voyageur in Canada, 1618-1642". Before 1632, the Indians had already given the French an account of the Winnipegou. Since they had not heard of Lake Michigan, they thought that the Winnebago lived north of Lake Huron.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.24
192
"Jean Nicolet, Interpreter and Voyageur in Canada, 1618-1642". Jean Nicolet reaches the Menominee at Green Bay. Long footnote on the name Puant.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.13
193
"Radisson and Grasseillers in Wisconsin: Papers; Third Voyage of Radisson". The Mascoutins told the French that they could take them to the Lake of the Stinkings. Lake Michigan was known by this name as well as other, including "Lake of the Puants". Green Bay and Lake Michigan were not considered separate.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.69
194
"Papers from Canadian Archives ... 1777-1778". Letter to H. E. de Carletonne, general in Canada. Dec. 31, 1778, met with Indians including Puants, and gave out wampum belts. Continued up the La Roche [Rock] River, encountered a village of 100 Puants and another of Sakis. Feb., encountered some Puants among the Scioux who were angry, thinking that their colleagues who went to Montreal had been killed by the English, and so were aggressive. The general pacified them. Feb. 25, encountered 9 lodges of the Puants, whose men were going to avenge a mistaken killing of one of their numbers by the Sauteux at Sac de Boeuf. Feb. 26, funeral for the dead by his 6 family members.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.102-104
195-197
"Gautier's Journal of a Visit to the Mississippi, 1777-1778". List of Indian recruits, including Puants.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.109-110
196
Letter of George Rogers Clark to Puants chief, Aug. 22, 1778. Notes that because the Puants have entered into friendship with the United States, he will be expected to treat any Americans in his territory as brothers.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.113
197
Letter of de Peyster to Haldinand, Michilimachinac, June 1, 1779. Brought a force of Winnebago and Menominee with him. They were afraid that in their absence the Sakis or Chippewas would fall upon their villages. Asked them to bring prisoners from among the Kaskaskias.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.131-132
198
Letter of Sinclair to Haldinand, Michilimachinac, Feb. 17, 1780. Authorizes the Menominees, Puants, Sacks and Renards to take the post at the Portage, and to seize all the corn that may be growing there for their own use.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.147-148
199
Various letters from the Canadian Archives. Sinclair to Boltan, June 4, 1780. "The Winnipago Indians without exception, attempted to storm it (a Spanish Breastwork) and lost a chief and three men on the spot, four are wounded and one of them (I fear) mortally. They are enraged against the backwardness of the Canadians and the base conduct of the Sacks, who have been debauched by the Rebels on account of their lead mines, and by the traders in their Country, who drew advantage of them." Sinclair to Haldinand (July 8, 1789). A party of Winnipigoes have been sent to disrupt the supply lines of the Rebels.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.154-157
200, 200 v.
Letter of Langlade to Capt. Robertson, March 5, 1783. The Puants on a plundering expedition lost a man, and in atonement required a great quantity of spoils for his life, which the local French Canadians were obliged to give for fear of their lives. Starvation was so bad among the Sauteux that they fell into cannibalism.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.164
201
Papers from the Canadian Archives. Report of the Council at Prairie du Chien, May 24, 1783. Council held among the Renards, Sacques, Scioux, Puants and Folles avoines. Speech of Vimotalaque, chief of the Renards. He excoriates Wabaisha (Dakota). He petitions the Puants to take away the "tree" that blocks their path, and calls them "kinsmen".
Wisc. Hist. Coll. XI.166-167
202-203†
Lt. John H. Fonda received orders from the Indian sub-agent to arrest the several hundred Winnebago in his area. When they came upon any Winnebagoes, they seized their guns and removed the locks from them. The Winnebago were taken to Prairie du Chien and on to their reservation. There were no more than a hundred stragglers left in Wisconsin.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.280-284
207-209
David McBride, "The Capture of Black Hawk." After the battle of Bad Axe, Black Hawk sought refuge among the Winnebago on the Lemonweir River. His trust in the Winnebago was misplaced, as they proved treacherous to both him and the whites. He and his companion the Prophet fled north to the Seven Miles Bluff. News soon came that the enemy were closing in, so they split up, and the chief hid in what is now know as "Black Hawk's Nest." The next day he met with Chaetar and One-Eyed Decorra. They had come to take him captive, but in the middle of the night he escaped. He rejoined the Prophet, and they intended to seek Keokuk. On the way that stopped at the Winnebago camp, and that is where the two Winnebago pursuers caught up to him and took him prisoner. They took him to Prairie du Chien. There is a long footnote on the Decorra family.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.293-297
210-216
"Winnebagoes and the Black Hawk War." The Winnebago population was about 2,000. They were peaceable, although sometimes drunkenness was a problem. They have earnestly applied themselves to agriculture. Wakon(haka) Decorah, the chief, then 84 (ca. 1859), told his story. They lived peaceably besides the white at Prairie du Chien. They had heard of the battles between the Fox and Sauk and the whites. A white officer came to him with a flag of the United States and a uniform, and asked him to join in the fight. He embraced the cause, since he himself was part white. The fighting, they lost 12 men. As the Sauks retreated, they burned the crops. They were on the warpath all season long, and brought Gen. Atkinson more prisoners than he could handle. They captured the Prophet, and later received rations from the army. He met Gen. Scott at Rock Island, and the general communicated the satisfaction of the Great Father. The Sauks struck back and had killed even Wakon's family. The Winnebagoes received no pay for their service because there had been no muster roll. But Little Hill could tell the names of all who had participated. His own relative had been the one who captured Black Hawk, and was now known by that name himself.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.306-309
216-221
"Early History of Education in Wisconsin." Schools for the voluntary instruction of Indian children were established in accord with the treaty of 1832. However, none of them worked out, despite the industrious efforts of Rev. David Lowry.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.328-329
222
"History of School Supervision in Wisconsin." A school was kept on the other side of the river from Prairie du Chien by Rev. David Lowry.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.356
222-223
Rev. Alfred Brunson, "A Sketch of Hole-in-the-Day." In 1825, Governor Cass assembled the Sioux, Chippewas, Winnebagoes, Monomonees, Sauks and Foxes at Prairie du Chien to settle the boundaries between them. It went well except for the Sioux and Chippewas, who made exaggerated claims to each other's lands.
Wisc. Hist. Coll. V.391
223
Origin of the name "Puans". They take their name from the "Bay of the Puants" which is the same as "Salt Water Bay." This name may arise from the mire in the bay.
Blair, Indian Tribes, I.288-290
220-221††
In former times the Puans were master of Green Bay. They were sodomites, practiced bestiality and cannibalism. The Malhominis were their only friends. They were extremely warlike, and anti-French. The Outawaks once sent them envoys whom they ate. They engaged in civil war, but had to retreat to a single village when all joined the Outawaks to war on them. Disease soon set in. Despite this, they sent 500 warriors against the Outagamis, but all of them perished in a storm on Lake Michigan. Famine soon beset them. The Islinois pitied them, and set 500 of their best people with ample provisions to aid them, but during the dance, they were ambushed and rubbed out. The Islinois assembled a revenge expedition and finally caught up with the Winnebago when they were concentrated in a single village. They killed or capture all of them save one, who escaped with arrow wounds.
Blair, Indian Tribes, I.293-298
222-225
The Winnebago number about 150 warriors. They are extremely haughty, although they are good soldiers. Their neighbors hate them, but the French have kept them from extinction through their friendship and protection.
Blair, Indian Tribes, I.300-301
226
The Sauks seized the northern part of the Green Bay peninsula, and the Pouteouatemis the southern half. This forced the Winnebago to cease the hunting of beaver, and to live on deer in the woods.
Blair, Indian Tribes, I.317
227
M. Talar, the Intendant of Canada in 1667, called the tribes to an assembly to notify them of the territorial claims of the King of France. Only the Puans showed up.
Blair, Indian Tribes, I.343
228
The French sent ahead the Puans to discover new tribes west of the Mississippi. When they found a new tribe, they were to light a signal fire. The Indians do this at night on tribal hunts so that they can see where one another are. After a time, the French saw a signal fire. The Puans had discovered a tribe called the Ayoës.
Blair, Indian Tribes, I.366
229
In their campaign against the Iroquois, the French took recruits from the Pouteoüatemis, the Malhominis, and the Puans.
Blair, Indian Tribes, II.20
230
The Puan chief, to aid the French, went to the Outagamis and told them that Perrot was coming with a huge army of French, Iroquois, Abenaquis, and Nepiciriniens.
Blair, Indian Tribes, II.54-56
231
The chief of the Puans was friendly to the French and would do anything for them. It was the opinion of the French that if the Outauaks should go forth, the other nations would follow them.
Blair, Indian Tribes, II.76
232
At a council, Perrot offered the calumet to all present as a show of their support, but one chief did not take it. The Puans intervened, giving him gifts of six kettles and two items of porcelain.
Blair, Indian Tribes, II.78
233
The Maskoutecks raided the Nadouaisioux, but carried off as prisoners some Puans and Ayoës who happened to be living nearby.
Blair, Indian Tribes, II.82-83
234
In the campaign against the Iroquois, the Outagamies held out, saying they would join only if the Sakis, Puans, and Pouteouwtemis first took the warpath. To effect their cooperation, "they were offered an Iroquois scalp with the words, 'here is an Iroquois who is given to you to eat ... if you do not go, we shall declare you an enemy."
Blair, Indian Tribes, II.85
235
Perrot arrived safely among the Puans, who were prepared to go to war against the Maskoutecks who had seized Perrot's property and threatened his life. But Perrot advised against this.
Blair, Indian Tribes, II.85
236
*page 74 is blank.
**contains a page 43a following page 43.
‡page 179 consists of two sheets.
†there are no pages numbered 204-206.
††The Wisconsin Historical Collections end on page 223, but the citations from Blair have an initial page numbered "220", causing an overlap of three page numbers.

Winnebago I, #7a
Freeman #3881

Reel 9

1908 Notebook. "Levi St. Cyr, Frank Beaver and John Raymond. Some Winnebago text but chiefly English."

Miscellaneous Notes, Ethnology
-
Charlie Green Rainbow's house, May 20.
1
List of informants
2
Green Rainbow, cont. Medicine Rite ceremony. (Pages hereafter numbered in odd numbers only).
3-11
List of Bird clans, lower moiety clans
13-15
Statement on the origins of the Thunder Clan by John Rave [= Thunderbird Clan Origin Myth (v. 5)].
17
Notes on the Medicine Rite feast.
19-21
Thunderbird Clan names.
23
"Stories by hearsay." Sticks used to dig potatoes: nawik'eda. Arrow points, fasting. Prayer to spirits, vision of Buffalo Spirit.
25-33
Story about Migistéga: the grizzly bear claw incident [= Migistéga’s Magic]. In English.
33-45
Migistéga's paint miracle [= Migistéga’s Magic]. In English.
45-49
End of Migistéga's life. [= The End of Mijistega's Life]. In English.
51-53
Little Priest Story in English [= Little Priest, How He went out as a Soldier]. For a text with parallel Winnebago and English, see Winnebago III, #5: 74-82; for an interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 224-241.
53-77*
Four Grizzly Bear Songs of Little Priest, in Hočąk and English.
78-79
Birth order names of boys and girls.
81-83
Marriage (one line), burial customs.
83-85
Notes on the Bear Clan from Green Crow (Kaǧičoga).
85-89, 91
Bear Clan Origins [= Bear Clan Origin Myth, v. 9], fragmentary. In English except for a song.
89
Bear Clan Origins, informant Eli Rasdell [= Bear Clan Origin Myth (v. 10)], fragmentary. In English only.
91
How the Hočągara used to live. Informant: Eli Rasdell. Clay pots, stone axes, logs, clothing, how boys trained for war, techniques of advance, molding bullets, Bear Clan sells lead mine to the government, wooden dishes and spoons, wooden pestles, preparing corn.
91-101
Fish Clan Origins. Informant: John Fisher. In English.
101
Coming across a bear; "if you eat boiled bear and squirrel together, you will soon be killed."
103
Ethnology by Joseph LaMère: lodge of Thunderbird Clan opposite that of Bear Clan, lodge a sanctuary, peacemaking role of chief, going on the warpath, revenge warpaths, murder. Song in Hočąk and English.
103-109
Ethnology: The four sons of Earthmaker. The Medicine Lodge. War dance description with an illustration of the drum. There are no pages numbered 115-117 and 121-123.
111-113, 119
Frank Ewing, Thunderbird Clan Origin Myth (v. 4).
125-129
Brave Man and gambling story by Charlie Houghton [= Brave Man Gambles]. Elsewhere attributed to Frank Ewing — see Winnebago III, #19c: 4-8.
131-137
Medicine Dance, June 30, 8 p.m. - to 5 am. of July 1 (1908). List of some of the participants. Diagram of the lodge.
139
Description of first day of the Medicine Rite.
141-147
XXVII. Charlie Houghton, Untitled. [= Turtle and the Merchant] Winnebago phonetic text only. For an interlinear texts see, Winnebago III, #9: 132-146, Winnebago III, #18: 630-637, and Winnebago III, #5: 93-98. For another version of Turtle and the Merchant, see Notebook 57.
151-169
XXVIII. Charlie Houghton, Untitled [= A Giant Visits His Daughter]. For another text, see Winnebago III, #5: 84-98, for an interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 98-107, and see also the text at Winnebago III, #18: 638-643.
171-181
Joseph LaMère, in English. Waruǧápara (The Thunderbird Warclub). "The informant of Joe Lamère's was George Brown Carpenter". Pagination changes from odd numbers only to even numbers only. For a typed version, see Winnebago IV, #8p.
183-191
12-118
Charlie Houghton, Untitled [= The Were-Grizzly], phonetic text only. Paginated in even numbers only. See the phonetic text at Winnebago III, #5: 60-64; for an interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 108-131, and see also the text at Winnbago III, #18: 643-649.
140-154
Charlie Houghton, Pig story [= Hog's Adventures], phonetic text only. Paginated in even numbers only. See the texts at Winnebago III, #5: 65-68, Winnebago III, #11a: 121-131, and Winnebago III, #18: 643-654.
156-170†
Charlie Houghton, phonetic text only. Paginated in even numbers only. Untitled [= Little Fox and the Ghost (v. 2)].
172-186
Unnumbered interstitial pages. First two used for arithmetic. The third contains a page with a diagram of the Medicine Rite lodge, with the following written around it: "Andrew Sharpback, South; John Fireman, East; Charlie Houghton, North; Mitchell, West". The fourth page shows the drawing (by Radin) of a bearded man with a list of the foundation dates of the thirteen original English colonies in America. The fifth page contains a map of the mouth of the Hudson River. The sixth page contains a list of items to be purchased and their price.
-
The beginning of a letter: "Dear Oliver [LaMère], I am going to Sioux City early tomorrow morning and may not get back until ..."
212
The conclusion of a letter by an unknown correspondent: "... block. It would take a person a half to a whole day to find a policeman, so you may know how much we have need of them. Neither do you pick up newspapers every morning on the Indian reservation and read that chief so & so had been robbed or that chief so & so had killed or robbed anybody else. It is no more the wild-west, but the tame west and the wild east."
216
Remarks on the Christianizing of the Winnebago. Paginated in even numbers only.
216-220
Notes entitled, "Death & Funeral [of] persons". Paginated in even numbers only.
222-234
Interstitial pages, the first of which is blank. The second has a Winnebago phrase and arithmetic; the third has a list of people: "Whitebreast, Charlie Houghton, Fireman } Levi [StCyr] as interpreter. John Pelkie = interpreter; Thomas Clay = [left blank], White Wing = [left blank], John Bear - Indians book [?], John Fisher." The fourth page has a rhombus divided into 18 parts each numbered to correspond with a color code given on the same page.
-
James Smith [and Thomas Clay], The Medicine Rite Foundation Myth [= The Medicine Rite Foundation Myth (v. 1)]. Phonetic text, paginated in odd numbers only. Other texts can be found at Winnebago II, #4, Winnebago III, #5: 1-55 (phonetic only), and Winnebago III, #18: 697-812.
203-287
Joseph LaMère, Untitled [= The Boy Captured by the Bad Thunderbirds]. In English only. For a typed text, see Winnebago IV, #8w.
289-311
Lists of kinship terms with forms of direct address. Paginated in odd numbers only.
311-323
Notes on joking relations.
325
Notes on marriage customs. Paginated in odd numbers only.
325-327
Notes on menstrual and birth customs. Taboos and restrictions regarding pregnant women. Birth names. Paginated in odd numbers only.
329-333
Notes entitled "Medicine Society" and "Mescal Ceremonies". Contains an interlinear text of a song and a transcription of its notes. Church roles of Albert Hensley and John Rave. Paginated in odd numbers only.
335-357
Notes entitled, "Effects of Mescal-bean". Paginated in odd numbers only.
357-369
Interlinear text of New Testament, John 1:1-3. Paginated in odd numbers only.
369-373
Further notes on the beliefs of the Christian Winnebagoes. Paginated in odd numbers only.
373-379
Remarks on the false characterization of Indians as "savages". Paginated in odd numbers only.
379-381
385-387
An itinerary. This appears not to be in Radin's hand.
383
A list of people: "Miss Natalie Curtis, Miss Anna Beecher Scovel, [Eli Rasdell, Charlie Houghton, Frank Ewing]".
389
*there is no page numbered "55".
†there is no page numbered "164".

Winnebago I, #7b
Freeman #3881
Reel 9

"Notes on lecture on Medicine Dance."

Half-pages with scribbling and obscure drawings.
2 pp.
Outline notes on the meaning of the Medicine Rite.
3 pp.

Winnebago I, #7c
Freeman #3881
Reel 9

The Four Nights Wake of the Thunderbird Clan.

Linguistic notes on the Four Nights Wake of the Thunderbird Clan — vocabulary and grammatical notes on 3 x 5 inch cards.
44 cards

Winnebago I, #7d
Freeman #3881
Reel 9

Part of a commentary on Blowsnake's story.

Numbered footnotes (1-49) to Sam Blowsnake's Autobiography
1-6

Winnebago I, #7e
Freeman #3881
Reel 9

Winnebago grammatical notes.

Grammatical notes; days of the week; seasons; positional suffixes.
1-2

Winnebago I, #7f
Freeman #3881
Reel 9

Miscellany, 93 pages.

Unnumbered, small sized pages of vocabulary and grammatical notes on the Huave language.
8 pp.
Woman Who Fought the Bear. (Entitled, Ai to Ke. Aott Ki r ni K. = Hitoke Hųjkizanįka, "Old Woman, Little Bear Fighter"). English only.
1-17
Coyote & the Ghost [= Little Fox and the Ghost (v. 1)], English text (published version). For an interlinear text of version 1, see Winnebago III, #5: 69-73. For an interlinear text to Little Fox and the Ghost (v. 2), see Winnebago III, #9: 147-159, and Winnebago III, #18: .655-661.
1-40
Lists of abbreviations used in Medicine Dance and Twins myth.
2 pp.
An Algonquian myth in English about Nanabush.
1 p.
Grammatical notes.
1 p.
Abbreviations used in Medicine Rite.
4 pp.
Outline of Medicine Lodge.
3 pp.
Big Walker story (57) [= Great Walker's Warpath]. (Entitled, m ni xeAe te K. = Manįxetega, "Great Walker"). English only. Unpaginated, but with circled numbers or sentences (1-50) within the text that correspond to a lost Winnebago syllabic text. The sheet with pages 41-44 is missing here, but has been preserved at Winnebago I, #3: 29.
14 pp.

Winnebago I, #8
Freeman #1400
Reel 9

Aboriginal history of North America, 3 pp. For more on this topic, see Winnebago I, #4.30-31.


Winnebago II, #1
Freeman #3872
Reel 9

Jasper Blowsnake's Account of the Medicine Rite. The notebook cover has the title: "First night preceding the four nights' preparations." Highly legible handwritten phonetic text, 205 pp. Only pages 1-25 have any interlinear translation. Pages 7-19 and 198-199 are missing.

Jasper Blowsnake's account of this rite is set out with revisions in the following notebooks: Winnebago II, #2; Winnebago II, #5; Winnebago II, #6; Winnebago II, #7; Winnebago III, #1; Winnebago III, #2; Winnebago III, #4; Winnebago III, #6; Winnebago III, #12.

Division
page.sentence
RL&D
CW
Two additional titlepages: "Winnebago Text. First Night Preceeding the Four Nights' Preparation"; and "The Preparatory Four Nights of Band E. Pages 192-226."
-
-
-
A single page with a note, "Do not translate any of these ..." and some cyphers.
-
-
-
3. First Night Preceeding the Four Nights' Preparation. Ancestor Host speaks. Typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 10.
3.1-6.39
85
-
Historical Origins of the Medicine Rite. For a typed phonetic text with a typed interlinear translation, see Winnebago II, #5: 10-14. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 28-32.
3-6
85-86
67.1-68.39
Missing pages. [These will have contained: The Preparatory Four Nights of the Ancestor-Host Band.]
7-19
-
-
[First Address of the Ancestor Host.] Sentence numbering is irregular.
20
-
-
Myth I. The Shell Anklets Origin Myth (v. 1). For a typewritten text (phonetic only), see Winnebago III, #12: 13-16. For the original interlinear MS, see Winnebago II, #6: 10-15 and Winnebago III, #1: 11). A typewritten phonetic text with a typewritten interlinear translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 21-29. For Version 2, see Winnebago III, #2: XV-XVI.
20-23
-
68.1-25
     Second Version of Myth I. For a typewritten text (phonetic only), see      Winnebago III, #12: 14.
23-25
-
69.1a-21a
     Continuation of Myth I. (End of the interlinear text.) For a typewritten text      (phonetic only), see Winnebago III, #12: 15-16.
25-27
-
68.25-36a
Speech of the Ancestor Host
28-30
 
-
Myth II. Keramaniš’aka's Blessing. A typewritten phonetic text with a typewritten interlinear translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 31-34. For a typed text, phonetic only, see Winnebago III, #12: 18-20. For the original interlinear MS, see Winnebago II, #6: 17-21.
30-33
92-93
69.1-70.36
Myth III. The Blessing of Kerexųsaka. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 22-28. For a typed text, phonetic only, see Winnebago III, #12: 21-23.
35-40
94-95
70.1(2)-71.40
Second Night
41-46
96-98
-
Third Night
47-51
98-100
-
Fourth Night
52-55
100-101
-
III. The Four Nights' Preparation of Band A [East].
56-94
102-117
-
First Night
56-67
102-106
-
Second Night
68-79
107-111
-
Third Night
80-89
112-116
-
Fourth Night
90-94
116-118
-
IV. The Preparatory Four Nights of Band B [North].
95-126
118-134
-
First Night
95-102
118-122
-
The Island Weight Songs. For a typed interlinear version of this text, see Winnebago II, #5: 97-99; and for the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 71-73.
96-97
119-120
-
Second Night
103-113
122-128
-
The Petition to Earthmaker. For the typed version of this text, see Winnebago II, #5: 106-109; and for the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 78-81.
103-106
123-124
-
Smoking Ceremony
106
124
-
Third Night
114-121
128-132
-
A Snake Song Origin Myth. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 97; for a typewritten version with a typewritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #5: 127.
120-121
132
-
Fourth Night
122-126
132-135
-
V. The Preparatory Four Nights of Band C [West].
127-150
135-150
-
The First Night
127-132
135-139
-
The Completion (Hiraísųjera) Song Origin. For a typed interlinear version of this text, see Winnebago II, #5: 135-136; for the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 103-104.
128-129
136-137
-
Great Walker's Medicine (v. 2). For a typed interlinear version of this text, see Winnebago II, #5: 137-138; for the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 105-106.
129-130
137-138
-
Great Walker and the Anishinaabe Witches. For a typed interlinear version of this text, see Winnebago II, #5: 138-140; for the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 106-108.
131-132
138-139
-
The Second Night
133-140
139-144
-
The Diving Contest. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 109-111. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 141-143.
134-135
140
-
The Sweetened Drink Song. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 113-114. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 146.
137
142
-
The Third Night
141-147
144-148
-
The Plant Blessing of Earth. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 123-124. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 157-158.
145-147
147-148
-
The Fourth Night
148-150
148-150
-
VI. The Preparatory Four Nights of Ghost's Band.
151-174
150-165
-
The First Night
151-160
150-157
-
Tobacco Origin Myth (v. 3). For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 129-130. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 164-165.
152-153
151
32.487-503
The Tap the Head Medicine. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 130-134. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 166-169.
153-155
152-153
-
The Claw Shooter. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 137-139. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 173-174.
159-160
156
-
The Second Night
161-165
157-159
-
The Third Night
166-172
160-163
Tobacco Origin Myth (v. 4). For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 150-151. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 187-188.
171-172
163
-
The Fourth Night
173-174
163-165
-
VII. The Preparatory Four Nights of Band D [South]. [This should probably be Band E.]
175-205
165-182
-
The First Night
175-182
165-170
Peace of Mind Regained. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 155-157. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 191-192.
175-177
165-166
-
The Second Night
183-192
170-175
-
The Journey to Spiritland, V. 2 [= The Journey to Spiritland (v. 5)]. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 165-166. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5:203-204.
185
171
-
The Third Night
193-202*
175-180
-
A Wife for Knowledge. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 180-181.
200-202
179-180
-
The Fourth Night
203-205
180-182
-
*there are no pages numbered 198 or 199.

Winnebago II, #2
Freeman #3888
Reel 9

The Medicine Rite by Jasper Blowsnake, continuing Winnebago III, #6, Appendix. Winnebago phonetic text only, very legible. Beginning on p. 421 the sentences are numbered starting with 277 and ending prematurely at sentence 408 on p. 440. At least some of this material seems to be of the same subject matter as Winnebago III, #2.

Jasper Blowsnake's account of this rite is set out with revisions in the following notebooks: Winnebago II, #1; Winnebago II, #5; Winnebago II, #6; Winnebago II, #7; Winnebago III, #1; Winnebago III, #2; Winnebago III, #4; Winnebago III, #6; Winnebago III, #12.

Division
page.sentence
RL&D
CW
Appendix. Hoixgǫ́xgǫ ruwína ("Acquisition of the Practices")
420.277-434.371
287
-
The Arrows of the Medicine Rite Men (v. 2). For the original interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #7: 213-215.
422.287-425.307
288-289
35.647-36.671
East Shakes the Messenger. For the original interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #7: 218-220.
430.340-432.357
293-294
36.672-686
East's Speech
434.371-435.376
294-295
-
West's Salutation Formula
435.377
301
-
Medicine Rite Foundation Myth [= The Medicine Rite Foundation Myth (v. 4)]. For the original interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #7: 233-247.
435.378-449
301-306
21.72-24.212
South's Salutation Formula
449
307
-
The Messengers of Hare (v. 2) (with a revised text at Winnebago III, #4: 25-29). For the original interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #7: 247-250.
449-456
307-309
24.213-26.239
North's Speech
456-458
310-311
-
North's Speech
459-460
311-312
-
North Shakes His Gourd.
460-462
312
-
South's Speech (North in RL&D)
463
313
-
Salutation Formula (North's Follower's Speech)
464-465
313-314
-
West's Speech
465-468
314-315
-
West's Speech
468
315
-
West's Speech
469-472
316-317
-
West's Speech
472
317
-
West's Speech
472-473
317-318
-
[The place where Death Enters the World should have occurred.] For the original interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #4: 18-25.
[missing]
320-322
27.305-29.379
South's Speech
473-474
322-323
-
Grandmother's Gifts. For the original interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #7: 253-256.
474-478
323-324
27.273-304
South's Speech
478-480
324-325
-
South's Speech
480-482
326
-
South Seizes the Messenger. For the original interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #7: 257-258.
482-483
326-327
-
South's Speech
483
327
-
South's Speech
483-485
327-328
-
East's Speech
485
328
-
North's Speech
485-486
328
-
West's Speech
486
329
-
South's Speech
486
329
-
East's Speech
486-487
329
-
[Italicized summary of shooting rite in RL&D].
487-489
329
-
North's Speech (including brief descriptive material in RL&D)
489
330
-
Ancestor-Host's Speech
489-491
330-331
-
East's Speech
491
331
-
[Various spirit impersonators speak, but are not identified in this text.]
491-494
331-333
-
Four Steps of the Cougar. For the original interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #7: 266-268.
494-497
333-334
36.687-37.712
End of published material (RL&D) [= Winnebago II, #7: 268].
497
334
-
Manáxjak ruwina ("Kicking the Earth")
506
-
-
Waráǧak'i ruwína ("Making the Sounds [Otter Noises]")
510
-
-
Ara wajigere hi-anąga wagujíkje ruwína ("Stretching out the Arms to Fullest Extent and Shouting")
512
-
-
Nųp hik'ičą́hi ruwína ("Two Shouting at Once")
514
-
-
Hinašax ruwina ("Shell Anklets")
516
-
-
The Shell Anklets Origin Myth (v. 2). For another copy, see Winnebago III, #2: XV-XVI. For Version 1, see Winnebago II, #6: 10-15 & Winnebago III, #1: 11; Winnebago II, #5: 21-29 (a typewritten phonetic text with a typewritten interlinear translation), Winnebago III, #12: 13-16 (typewritten phonetic text).
516-517
-
-
Mązuáguje ("Iron Mocassins")
518
-
-
Neǧójį ruwína ("Acquisition of the Drum")
523
-
-
The Descent of the Drum (v. 2). For another copy, see Winnebago III, #2: XX-XXII. For Version 1, see Winnebago II, #6: 190-193 - Winnebago II, #7: 194-195.
524
-
-
Čigirukóǧire ("They Help [?] with the Lodge")
527
-
-
Hañke Gujiráni ("Not Shooting")
531
-
-
Last page of Jasper Blowsnake's account of the Medicine Rite
532
-
-

Radin Notebooks, Winnebago II, #3
Freeman #3895

Reel 9

"Unfinished transcription and translation of a father initiate-son story." Four pages of text.

Contents
Story of Wešgíšega (interlinear)* [= Earthmaker Blesses Wagíšega (Wešgíšega) (v. 2)]. For a reprint of the published version, see Winnebago I, #2.
last page has conjugations for the verbs meaning "to fast" and "to bless".
*published in Paul Radin, "Personal Reminiscences of a Winnebago Indian," Journal of American Folk-Lore, 26, #102 (1913): 293-318 (Sam Blowsnake, "How One of My Ancestors was Blessed by Earthmaker," pp. 294-298).

Radin Notebooks, Winnebago II, #4
Freeman #3883

Reel 9

The Foundation Myth of the Winnebago Medicine Rite, by Thomas Clay and James Smith [= The Medicine Rite Foundation Myth (v. 1)]. Clear Winnebago-English interlinear with notes: 1 - 123, pagination in odd numbers only. Other texts can be found at Winnebago I, #7a: 203-287 (phonetic only), Winnebago III, #5: 1-55 (phonetic only), and Winnebago III, #18: 697-812.


Radin Notebooks, Winnebago II, #5
Freeman #3875

Reel 9

Jasper Blowsnake's Account of the Medicine Rite. Hand corrected, typed phonetic text whose typed interlinear translation ends prematurely on p. 108. The typed phonetic text continues to page 317, where it resumes in MS form at Winnebago III, #6. English subtitles found in The Road of Life and Death are used throughout.

Jasper Blowsnake's account of this rite is set out with revisions in the following notebooks: Winnebago II, #1; Winnebago II, #2; Winnebago II, #6; Winnebago II, #7; Winnebago III, #1; Winnebago III, #2; Winnebago III, #4; Winnebago III, #6; Winnebago III, #12.

Divisions of the Rite and Stories
page
RL&D
CW
Introduction: How Blowsnake joined the Medicine Dance.
1
 
-
A. First Introductory Night. Part I. The Preparation for the Ceremony Proper. The two nights preceeding the Four Night's Preparation.
3
 
-
The Messengers of Hare (v. 1). For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 3-7.
5-9
82-84
-
Second Introductory Night
10-14
85-86
-
Historical Origins of the Medicine Rite. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 28-32, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 3-6.
10-14
85-86
67.1-68.39
C. Invitation Rite
15-17
86-96
-
Four Nights Preparation of the Host. First Night
18-41
88-96
-
The Shell Anklets Origin Myth (v. 1). For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6, 10-15, and Winnebago III, #1: 11. For a typewritten text (phonetic only), see Winnebago III, #12: 13-16, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 20-23. For Version 2, see Winnebago III, #2: XV-XVI.
21-29
89-91
61.1-69.36a
Keramaniš’aka's Blessing. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 17-21, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 30-33. For a typed text, phonetic only, see Winnebago III, #12: 18-20.
31-34
92-93
69.1(2)-70.36
The Blessing of Kerexųsaka. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 22-28. For a typed text, phonetic only, see Winnebago III, #12: 21-23, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 35-40.
36-39
94-95
70.1(2)-71.40
Second Night
42-46
96-98
-
Third Night
47-51
98-100
-
Fourth Night
52-54
100-101
-
Four Nights Preparation of Band A [East].
55-95
102-117
-
First Night
55-66
102-106
-
Second Night
67-79
107-111
-
Third Night
80-90
112-116
-
Fourth Night
91-95
116-118
-
Four Nights Preparation of Band B [North] (crossed out).
96-133
118-134
-
First Night
96-105
118-122
-
The Island Weight Songs. This text is a typewritten interlinear with pencil corrections. For a handwritten version of this text, see Winnebago II, #1: 96-97; and for the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 71-73.
97-99
119-120
-
Second Night.
106-118
122-128
-
The Petition to Earthmaker. For a handwritten version of this text, see Winnebago II, #1: 103-106; and for the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 78-81.
106-109
123-124
-
End of interlinear text. From this point on, the text is in Winnebago only.
108
124
-
Smoking Ceremony.
109
124
-
Third Night.
119-128
128-132
-
A Snake Song Origin Myth. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 97; for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 120-121.
127
132
-
Fourth Night.
129-133
132-135
-
D. The Preparatory Four Nights of Band C [West].
134-162
135-150
-
The First Night
134-140
135-139
-
The Completion (Hiraísųjera) Song Origin. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 103-104; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 128-129.
135-136
136-137
-
Great Walker's Medicine (v. 2). For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 105-106; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 129-130.
137-138
137-138
-
Great Walker and the Anishinaabe Witches. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 106-108; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 131-132.
138-140
138-139
-
The Second Night
141-150
139-144
-
The Diving Contest. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 109-111; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 134-135.
141-143
140
-
The Sweetened Drink Song. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 113-114; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 137.
146
142
-
The Third Night
151-158
144-148
-
The Plant Blessing of Earth. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 123-124; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 145-147.
157-158
147-148
-
The Fourth Night
159-162
148-150
-
E. The Preparatory Four Nights of Band D [Ghost].
163-191
150-165
-
The First Night
163-175
150-157
-
Tobacco Origin Myth (v. 3). For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 129-130; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 152-153.
164-165
151
32.487-503
The Tap the Head Medicine. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 130-134; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 153-155.
166-169*
152-153
-
The Claw Shooter. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 137-139; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 159-160.
173-174
156
-
The Second Night
176-180
157-159
-
The Third Night
181-188
160-163
-
The Fourth Night
189-191
163-165
-
Tobacco Origin Myth (v. 4). For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 150-151; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 171-172.
187-188
163
-
E. The Preparatory Four Nights of Band E [South] (this is crossed out).
192-226
165-182
-
The First Night
192-200
165-170
-
Peace of Mind Regained. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 155-157; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 175-177.
192-193
165-166
-
The Second Night
201-[206]
170-175
-
The Journey to Spiritland, V. 2 [= The Journey to Spiritland (v. 5)]. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #1: 165-166; and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 185.
203-204
171
-
The Preparatory Four Nights of Band E [South] comes to a premature end here.
206
173
-
VIII. The Sweat-bath Ritual
227-286
183-212
-
Hare Secures the Creation Lodge of the Medicine Rite. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 69-81.
258-268
198-202
29.380-32.486
Lifting Up the Bear Heads. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 94-96.
277-279
207
-
IX. Main Ceremony (continued at Winnebago III, #6)
287-317
213-?
-
Night Division. Pages 288-292 are missing.
287-317†
213-249
-
End of the typed account of the Medicine Rite. A highly legible handwritten version is continued at Winnebago III, #6.
317
240?
-
Introductory Ceremonies of the Medicine Rite (handwritten, partial interlinear) with numerous pagination anomalies.
15 pp.
 
-
*pages 166 and 167 are filmed in reverse order.
†pages 303 and 304 were filmed in reverse order.

Winnebago II, #6
Freeman #3876
Reel 10

Jasper Blowsnake's Account of the Medicine Rite.

Jasper Blowsnake's account of this rite is set out with revisions in the following notebooks: Winnebago II, #1; Winnebago II, #2; Winnebago II, #5; Winnebago II, #7; Winnebago III, #1; Winnebago III, #2; Winnebago III, #4; Winnebago III, #6; Winnebago III, #12.

Divisions of the Rite and Stories
II, #6
RL&D
CW
Short page on the whereabouts of various MSS
1*
-
-
An outline description of the introduction of the initiate at the beginning of the rite (in English)
3
-
-
Miscellaneous notes on the organizing of the rite
4
-
-
I. How (Jasper) Blowsnake joined the Medicine Dance (Interlinear text with a wide left margin for notes)
5-7
-
-
II. How Blowsnake was introduced
7
-
-
(Pt. 1, Ritual of Tears)
7-34
81-182
-
Ceremonies Held the Night Invitations are Sent Out (The Preliminary Ceremonies) (continued at Winnebago III, #1: 3)
7
81-88
-
The Preparatory Four Nights of the Ancestor-Host's Band
7-34
88-102
-
1.The First Night
7-9, 28-32
88-95
-
The Shell Anklets Origin Myth (v. 1) (continued at Winnebago III, #1: 11). A typewritten phonetic text with a typewritten interlinear translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 21-29, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 20-23. For a typewritten text (phonetic only), see Winnebago III, #12: 13-16. For Version 2, see Winnebago III, #2: XV-XVI.
10-15
89-91
68.1-69.36a
Songs Sung by Leaders of the Band giving the Dance (one song in Sauk given)
15-16
-
-
Keramaniš’aka's Blessing. A typewritten phonetic text with a typewritten interlinear translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 31-34. For a typed text, phonetic only, see Winnebago III, #12: 18-20, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 30-33.
17-21
92-93
69.1(2)-70.36
The Woman's Scalp Medicine Bundle [This story exists only in a footnote in Radin's published text.]
-
337 nt 30
70.27a-36?
The Blessing of Kerexųsaka. A typewritten phonetic text with a typewritten interlinear translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 36-39, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 35-40. For a typed text, phonetic only, see Winnebago III, #12: 21-23.
22-28
94-95
70.1(2)-71.40
Historical Origins of the Medicine Rite. For a typed phonetic text with a typed interlinear translation, see Winnebago II, #5: 10-14, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 3-6.
28-32
85-86
67.1-68.39
2. The Second Night (continued at Winnebago III, #1: 19)
29
96
-
End of the First Night (out of order) (continued at Winnebago III, #1)
33-34
95-96
-
Ritual of Tears continued at Winnebago III, #1: 3
34
96
-
Ceremonies Connected with the Steam Bath (Pt. 2, Ritual of Purification)
35-107
183-212
-
Hare Secures the Creation Lodge of the Medicine Rite. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 258-268.
69-81
198-202
29.380-32.486
Lifting Up the Bear Heads. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 277-279.
94-96
207
-
list of Greek letters and other symbols used as morpheme abbreviations in this text
107/108
-
-
Ceremonies Connected with the Medicine Lodge Proper, Night Ceremonies (Pt. 3, Ritual of Expectations)
108-155†
213-249
-
East Enters the Medicine Lodge (v. 1)
110
215
-
Ceremonies Told the Initiate About Sunrise ... (Pt. 4, Ritual of Rewards)
156-180
250-265
-
The Creation of the World [= The Creation of the World (v. 12)]
159-164
252-255
19.1-3.59a
The Creation of Man [= The Creation of Man (v. 8)]
164-166
255
3.60-71
Otter Comes to the Medicine Rite. For another text (phonetic only), see Winnebago III, #6: 357-361.
166-169
255-257
32.504-33.546
The Journey to Spiritland [= The Journey to Spiritland (v. 4)]. For the revised phonetic text (without the commentaries), see Winnebago III, #6: 362.91-372.140.
169-176
257-264
I.66.1-69.102
Commentary to Spiritland journey, in English only
169/170
258-260
-
Commentary to Spiritland journey, in English only
170/171
260-263
-
Commentary to Spiritland journey, in English only
171/172
263-264
-
Testing the Slave. For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #6: 375.155-376.158.
178
265
-
Pt. 5, Ritual of Life, Death, and Rebirth (continued at Winnebago II, #7: 194)
179-193
266-277
-
East Enters the Medicine Lodge (v. 2). For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #6: 378.10-380.17.
181-182
267
-
South Enters the Medicine Lodge (v. 2). For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #6: 389.66-390.72.
187-188
272-273
-
The Descent of the Drum (v. 1) (continued at Winnebago II, #7: 194). For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #6: 394.90-399.119. For Version 2, see Winnebago III, #2: XX-XXII.
190-193
275-277
33.547-34.596
*there is no page 2.
†there are no pages numbered "116" or "147".

Winnebago II, #7
Freeman #3887
Reel 10

Continuation of Jasper Blowsnake's Account of the Medicine Rite.

Jasper Blowsnake's account of this rite is set out with revisions in the following notebooks: Winnebago II, #1; Winnebago II, #2; Winnebago II, #5; Winnebago II, #6; Winnebago III, #1; Winnebago III, #2; Winnebago III, #4; Winnebago III, #6; Winnebago III, #12.

Pages are numbered consecutively from Winnebago II, #6.

Divisions of the Rite and Stories
II, #7
RL&D
CW
(Pt. 5, Ritual of Life, Death, and Rebirth) (continued from Winnebago II, #6: 193)
194-268
275-334
-
The Descent of the Drum (v. 1) (continued from Winnebago II, #6: 193). For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #6: 394.90-399.119. For Version 2, see Winnebago III, #2: XX-XXII.
194-195
275-277
33.547-34.596
The Commandments of Earthmaker. For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #6: 410.130-403.139.
196-198
278-279
-
Ancestor Host [X'okéra] (continued at Winnebago III, #4: 15; for a revised phonetic text, see Winnnebago III, #6: 403.140-407.166).
200
280-281
-
The Coughing Up of the Black Hawks. For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #6: 281-282.
201-202
281-282
-
The Animal Spirit Aids of the Medicine Rite. For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #6: 285-287.
207-211
285-287
34.597-35.646
The Arrows of the Medicine Rite Men (v. 2). For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #2: 288-289.
213-215
288-289
35.647-36.671
East Shakes the Messenger. For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #2: 293-294.
218-220
293-294
36.672-686
Medicine Rite Foundation Myth [= The Medicine Rite Foundation Myth (v. 4)]. For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #2: 435-449.
233-247
301-306
21.72-24.212
The Messengers of Hare (v. 2) (with a revised text at Winnebago III, #4: 25-29). For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #2: 449-456.
247-250
307-309
24.213-26.239
Resumes p. 233, last line
250
301
-
Resumes p. 233, line 10 (second speech of South)
251
omitted ?
-
First speech of South
253
omitted ?
-
Grandmother's Gifts. For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #2: 474-478.
253-256
323-324
27.273-304
South Seizes the Messenger. For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #2: 482-483.
257-258
326-327
-
Four Steps of the Cougar. For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #2: 494-497.
265-268
333-334
36.687-37.712
End of the published version (RL&D) [= Winnebago II, #2: 497 (revised phonetic text). However, the phonetic text goes on for 35 pages with what was to have been an appendix.].
268
334
-
Songs sung by women
269-272
-
-
Five bands of the Medicine Rite that may subdivide themselves
273
-
-
The story of Čap’ósgaga, by John Baptiste, told in summary (= The Fox-Hočąk War, Version II).
273-274
-
-

Some of this material is extended and revised in Winnebago III, #4.


Winnebago III, #1
Freeman #3898
Reel 10

Continuation of Jasper Blowsnake's Account of the Medicine Rite.

Jasper Blowsnake's account of this rite is set out with revisions in the following notebooks: Winnebago II, #1; Winnebago II, #2; Winnebago II, #5; Winnebago II, #6; Winnebago II, #7; Winnebago III, #2; Winnebago III, #4; Winnebago III, #6; Winnebago III, #12.

Divisions of the Rite and Stories
III, #1
RL&D
CW
Pt. 1, Ritual of Tears (continued from Winnebago II, #6: 7-34)
3-185
81-182
-
Ceremonies Held the Night Invitations are Sent Out (The Preliminary Ceremonies) (continued from Winnebago II, #6: 7)
3-10
81-88
-
The Messengers of Hare (v. 1). For a typed phonetic text with typed interlinear translation, see Winnebago II, #5: 5-9.
3-7
82-84
-
The Shell Anklets Origin Myth (v. 1) (continued from Winnebago II, #6: 10-15). A typewritten phonetic text with a typewritten interlinear translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 21-29, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 20-23. For a typewritten text (phonetic only), see Winnebago III, #12: 13-16. For Version 2, see Winnebago III, #2: XV-XVI.
11-16
89-91
61.1-69.36a
     End of the First Night (continued from Winnebago II, #6: 34)
17-18
95-96
-
     The Second Night (continued from Winnebago II, #6: 29)
19-23
96
-
     The Third Night
24-27
98
-
     The Fourth Night
28-30
100-101
-
The Preparatory Four Nights of the East's Band
31-69
102-117
-
     The First Night
31-42
102-106
-
     The Second Night
43-54
107-111
-
     The Third Night
55-64
112-116
-
     The Fourth Night
65-69
116-118
-
The Preparatory Four Nights of the North's Band
70-102
118-134
-
     The First Night
70-77
118-122
-
The Island Weight Songs. For a handwritten version of this text, see Winnebago II, #1: 96-97; and its typed phonetic version with a typed interlinear translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 97-99.
71-73
119-120
-
     The Second Night
78-89
122-128
-
The Petition to Earthmaker. For a handwritten version of this text, see Winnebago II, #1: 103-106; and its typed phonetic version with a typed partial translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 106-109.
78-81
123-124
-
     The Third Night
90-97
128-132
-
A Snake Song Origin Myth. A typed phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #5: 127; and its handwritten version is at Winnebago II, #1: 120-121.
97
132
-
     The Fourth Night
98-102
132-135
-
The Preparatory Four Nights of the West's Band
102-127
135-149
-
     The First Night
102-108
135-139
-
The Completion Song Origin. A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 128-129; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 135-136.
103-104
136-137
-
Great Walker's Medicine (v. 2). A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 129-130; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 137-138.
105-106
137-138
-
Great Walker and the Anishinaabe Witches. A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 131-132; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 138-140.
106-108
138-139
-
     The Second Night
109-117
139-144
-
The Diving Contest. A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 134-135; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 141-143.
109-111
140
-
The Sweetened Drink Song. A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 137; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 146.
113-114
142
-
     The Third Night
118-124
144-148
-
The Plant Blessing of Earth. A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 145-147; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 157-158.
123-124
147-148
-
     The Fourth Night
125-127
148-150
-
The Preparatory Four Nights of the Ghost's Band
128-154
150-165
-
     The First Night
128-139
150-157
-
Tobacco Origin Myth (v. 3). A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 152-153; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 164-165.
129-130
151
32.487-503
The Tap the Head Medicine. A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 153-155; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 166-169.
130-134
152-153
-
The Claw Shooter. A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 159-160; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 173-174.
137-139
156
-
     The Second Night
140-144
157-159
-
     The Third Night
145-151
160-163
-
Tobacco Origin Myth (v. 4). A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 171-172; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 187-188.
150-151
163
-
     The Fourth Night
152-154
163-165
-
The Preparatory Four Nights of the South's Band
155-185
165-182
-
     The First Night
155-166
165-170
-
Peace of Mind Regained. A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 175-177; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 192-193.
155-157
165-166
-
     The Second Night
167-173
170-175
-
The Journey to Spiritland, V. 2 [= The Journey to Spiritland (v. 5)]. A handwritten phonetic text is found at Winnebago II, #1: 185; and its typed version at Winnebago II, #5: 203-204.
165-166
171
-
     The Third Night
174-182
175-180
-
A Wife for Knowledge. A highly legible hand written version is found at Winnebago II, #1: 200-202.
180-181
179-180
-
     The Fourth Night
183-185
180-182
-
Loose notes on ethnology, including remarks about the soul and the ghost. The notes are written on smaller sized paper bearing the letter head, "Smithsonian Institution" and "Bureau of American Ethnology".
186-191
-
-
     Written on small, wide, rectangular paper placed interstitially between      187-190, but in reverse order (p. 1 = 190v, p. 2 = 189v, p. 3 = 188v, p.      4 = 187v), is a story of witchcraft [= The Witch Men's Desert].
4 pp.
-
-
Two diagrams of the Medicine Lodge and Rite
191/192
-
-
Notes and diagrams pertaining to the Medicine Feast
192-197
-
-

Winnebago III, #2
Freeman #3885
Reel 10

Jasper Blowsnake's Account of the Ruwína (Acquisitions) of the Medicine Rite (unpublished).

Jasper Blowsnake's account of this rite is set out with revisions in the following notebooks: Winnebago II, #1; Winnebago II, #2; Winnebago II, #5; Winnebago II, #6; Winnebago II, #7; Winnebago III, #1; Winnebago III, #4; Winnebago III, #6; Winnebago III, #12. Cf. Winnebago II, #2, which appears to have much the same material.

Ruwína (Acquisitions) and Stories
page
§1. Hoixgǫ́xgǫ Ruwína (The Acquisition of the Practices)
I-IX
§2. Waǧáǧak'í Ruwína (Making the Sounds [Otter Noises])
X
§3. Ára Wajígere Hiánąga Wagujíkje Ruwína (Stretching out the Arms to Fullest Extent and Shouting)
XI-XII
§4. Nųp Hikičą́hi Ruwína (Two Shouting at Once)
XIII-XIV
§5. Hinašax Ruwiná (Shell Anklets)
XV-XVI
The Shell Anklets Origin Myth (v. 2). For another text (phonetic only), see Winnebago II, #2: 516-517. For Version 1, see Winnebago II, #6: 10-15 continuing at Winnebago III, #1: 11-16, and Winnebago III, #12: 13-16 (typewritten, phonetic only).
XV-XVI
§6. Mą́zwáguje (Iron Mocassin). Thus use of the iron mocassin by the great medicine men of the Rite; use of poisons by these members.
XVII-XIX
§7. Reǧójį Ruwína (The Drum)
XX-XXII
The Descent of the Drum (v. 2). For another text (phonetic only), see Winnebago II, #2: 524. For Version 1, see Winnebago II, #6: 190-193 - Winnebago II, #7: 194-195.
XX-XXII
§8. Čígirukoǧiré. Contains an account of how a man's son was initiated into the Rite
XXIII-XXV
§9. Hąké Gujiráni (Not Shooting). Things done to test whether the initiate could control anger.
XXVI-XXVII
Miscellaneous Notes. Contains an illustration of the Mąs Wagujéra.
XXVIII (finit)

A faint table of contents for the Ruwina is found at Winnebago III, #4: 30.


Radin Notebooks, Winnebago III, #3
Freeman #3874

Reel 10

Four Nights' Wake of the Thunderbird Clan, by J. F. [John Fireman ?].

The Winnebago phonetic text, which is without interlinear translation, is written in ink in a very legible hand. Its English translation is typewritten. The sentences are numbered in the phonetic text to correspond with both the original text (Notebook 77) and the typed translation.

Winnebago Phonetic Text
pages
English Trs.
(a) General Description (44 sentences)
95-98
43-45
(b) Addresses to the Ghost, First Version (40 sentences). For an interlinear text, see Notebook 77, 1-11.
99-102
45-49
     Journey to Spiritland, Thunderbird Clan (Journey to Spiritland, version 1a). For an      interlinear text, see Notebook 77, 1-11.
99-102
46-49
(c) Address to the Ghost: Journey to Spiritland, Second Version (40 sentences). For an interlinear text, see Notebook 77, 11-24.
102-107
49-51
     Journey to Spiritland, Thunderbird Clan (Journey to Spiritland, version 1b). For an      interlinear text, see Notebook 77, 12-21.
103-107
49-51
(d) Beliefs Concerning Ghosts (20 sentences) For an interlinear text, see Notebook 77, 22-24.
107-109
52-53

Radin Notebooks, Winnebago III, #4
Freeman #3890
Reel 10

Extentions and Revisions of Jasper Blowsnake's Account of the Medicine Rite.

Jasper Blowsnake's account of this rite is set out with revisions in the following notebooks: Winnebago II, #1; Winnebago II, #2; Winnebago II, #5; Winnebago II, #6; Winnebago II, #7; Winnebago III, #1; Winnebago III, #2; Winnebago III, #6; Winnebago III, #12.

Revisions & Extensions / Stories
III, #4
RL&D
CW
Revisions. Speeches of Wanaǧik'ų (Ghost Impersonator). Omitted between the greetings of North and South, p. 39 (Winnebago II, #6)
1
185 ¶1 (Ghost)
-
Continues from 40-42
1
?
-
Continues from 42 line 12
1
?
-
Continues from 50 line 4
2
?
-
Continues from 53 line 6
2
190 ¶2 (Ghost)
-
Continues from 109 line 4
3-4
214 (East)
-
Continues from 109 line 13
4
214-215 (East)
-
Continues from 114 line 9
4
?
-
Continues from 120 line 1
5
222 (Ghost)
-
Continues from 118 line 1
5-8
219-220 (South) & 220 (Ghost)
-
Continues from 120 line 4
9-10
221-222 (Ghost)
-
Speeches of South in the Evening
10-11
222-223
-
South Enters the Medicine Lodge (v. 1)
10-11
222-223
 
Continues from 150 line 12
12-14
242-245 (several speeches by Ghost)
-
Continues 200 line 2 from Winnebago II, #7; for a revised phonetic text, see Winnnebago III, #6: 403.140-407.166).
15
280-281 (Ancestor Host [X'okéra])
-
Continues 233 line 2
15-17
?
-
Continues 251 line 1
18
320 (Ghost)
-
Death Enters the World.
18-25
320-322
27.305-29.379
The Messengers of Hare (v. 2) (replaces p. 247, line 11 - p. 250, line 4j of Winnebago II, #7)
25-29
307-309
-
Categories of Ruwína (for Winnebago III, #2) in English only. The word "Privileges" is written in the margin.
30
-
-

Winnebago III, #5
Freeman #3882

Reel 10

Origin Myth of the Medicine Dance, told by J. W. [James Smith] and T. C. [Thomas Clay], July, 1908. Myths by Charlie Houghton written in an extremely clear phonetic text without translation.

Stories
page
Origin Myth of the Medicine Dance (by James Smith and Thomas Clay) [= The Medicine Rite Foundation Myth (v. 1)]. Very faint phonetic text with rare interlinear translation. Other texts can be found at Winnebago I, #7a: 203-287, Winnebago II, #4, and Winnebago III, #18: 697-812.
1-55
Stories by Charlie Houghton:
-
I. [missing from the series]
-
II. Untitled [= The Old Man and the Giants]. For an interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #9: 163-182 (incomplete); the complete text is at Winnebago III, #18: 661+ - 675.
56-59
III. The Were-Grizzly. For an interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 108-131; and see also the text at Winnebago I, #7a, and Winnbago III, #18: 643-649.
60-64
IV. Hog's Adventures. See the texts at Winnebago I, #7a: 156-170, Winnebago III, #11a: 121-131, and Winnebago III, #18: 643-654.
65-68
V. Coyote & the Ghost [= Little Fox and the Ghost (v. 1)], see Winnebago I, #7b: 1-40; for version 2, see below.
69-73
VI. Story of Little Priest [= Little Priest, How He went out as a Soldier], by John Harrison, June, 1908. The Hočąk text is at the top half of the page, the English translation is at the bottom half. For an English translation, see Winnebago I, #7a, and for an interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 224-241.
74-82
VII. Turtle and the Witches.
83
VIII. A Giant Visits His Daughter. For an interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 98-107, and see the text at Winnebago III, #18: 638-643.
84-92
IX. Turtle and the Merchant. Interlinear text. For a phonetic text only, see Winnebago I, #7a: 151-169. For other interlinear texts, see Winnebago III, #9: 132-146, and Winnebago III, #18: 630-637.
93-98
X. Coyote (Little Fox) is Invited to a Feast [= Little Fox and the Ghost (v. 2)]. For an interlinear text, see Winnbago III, #9: 147-159, and Winnebago III, #18: .655-661. For version 1, see above.
99-100
XI. Turtle's Warparty, by Charlie Houghton, July, 1908. Phonetic text only. For phonetic texts with interlinear translations, see Winnebago III, #11a:245-285 and Winnebago III, #18: 314-360. For another version of this story, see Notebooks 28-29, and Winnebago IV, #8j (typed English only). See the version by Jim Pine at Notebook 26.
101-115

Winnebago III, #6
Freeman #3886
Reel 10

Material from the Medicine Rite as described by Jasper Blowsnake. A handwritten continuation of the typed version at Winnebago II, #5 which itself continues at Winnebago II, #2. Phonetic text neatly written on every other line with numbered sentences. The text given here is radically revised in The Culture of the Winnebago, As Described by Themselves (CW). [nd] D. 102 pp.

Jasper Blowsnake's account of this rite is set out with revisions in the following notebooks: Winnebago II, #1; Winnebago II, #2; Winnebago II, #5; Winnebago II, #6; Winnebago II, #7; Winnebago III, #1; Winnebago III, #2; Winnebago III, #4; Winnebago III, #12.

Divisions of the Rite and Stories
III, #6
RL&D
CW
A note with "Paul Radin" written at the top and reading, "'Dear Kwan', Please tell Charlie to put these with a few other things I put in the attic."
-
-
-
Diagram of the Council Lodge showing the position of the various clans
-
-
-
Continuation of IX. Main Ceremony — Night Division, from Winnebago II, #5: 317.
318.198-343.311
240?-249?
-
X. Brush Ritual
344.1-377.165
250*
-
Speeches of the Ancestor Host
344.1-347.16
250-252
-
Medicine Rite Foundation Myth, V. 2 =
347.17-357.64
252-255
19.1-21.71
     The Creation of the World [= The Creation of the World (v. 12)]  
252-255
-
     The Creation of Man [= The Creation of Man (v. 8)]  
255
-
Otter Comes to the Medicine Rite. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 166-169.
357.65-361.86
255-257
32.504-33.546
Speech of North
361.87-362.90
257
-
The Journey to Spiritland [= The Journey to Spiritland (v. 4)]. For the original handwritten interlinear text (with commentaries in English) see Winnebago II, #6: 169-176.
362.91-372.140
257-264
I.66.1-69.102
Testing the Slave. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 178.
375.154-376.158
265
-
XI. The Main Ceremonial — Day Division
377.1-420.273
265
-
East Enters the Medicine Lodge (v. 2). For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 181-182.
378.10-380.17
267
-
South Enters the Medicine Lodge (v. 2). For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 187-188.
389.66-390.72
272-273
-
The Descent of the Drum (v. 1) (continued at Winnebago II, #7: 194). For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #6: 190-193. For Version 2, see Winnebago III, #2: XX-XXII.
394.90-399.119
275-277
33.547-34.596
The Commandments of Earthmaker. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #7: 196-198.
401.130-403.139
278-279
-
Ancestor Host [X’okéra] (the original interlinear text is at Winnebago II, #7: 200, with continuations at Winnebago III, #4: 15).
403.140-407.166
280-281
-
The Coughing Up of the Black Hawks. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #7: 201-202.
407.171-409.187
281-282
-
The Animal Spirit Aids of the Medicine Rite. For the original handwritten interlinear text, see Winnebago II, #7: 207-211.
415.230-420-271
285-287
34.597-35.646
Last sentence: "Well ancestors, I am tired of standing and of making you stand so, I beg of you, do have compassion on me." Continued at Winnebago II, #2.
420.273
287
-
*the Brush Ritual is only summarized in RL&D.

Winnebago III, #7
Freeman #3868
Reel 10

The Bear Clan Feast and Origin Legend. Phonetic text only, very legibly written on every other line. For an interlinear text, see Notebook 24.

Division pages sentences WT
Part I. Bear Clan Origin Legend [= Bear Clan Origin Myth, Version 7]
1-6
1-62
184-186
Part II. Bear Clan Feast
7-10
1-47
-

Winnebago III, #8
Freeman #3889
Reel 10

Rave's grandmother, etc. [nd] D. 20 pp. Phonetic texts.

Division pages sentences
Rave's grandmother. For a phonetic interlinear text, see Notebook 26.
1-3
1-25
Rave's grandfather. For a phonetic interlinear text, see Notebook 26.
4-6
1-23
Aračgega [= Aračgéga's Blessings]. For another phonetic text, see Notebook 39.
7-13
1-72
Hataginanč Waruičarena ("The Eating after the Fast"). This is "The Girl who Refused a Blessing from the Wood Spirit". [Published in WT 254-256.]
14-20
1-77

Winnebago III, #9
Freeman #3894
Reel 10

Four phonetic texts with interlinear translation, 51 pp.

Turtle and the Merchant, told by Charlie Houghton, translation by Oliver LaMere. For a phonetic text only, see Winnebago I, #7a: 151-169. For other interlinear texts, see Winnebago III, #18: 630-637, and Winnebago III, #5: 93-98.
132-146
Coyote is Invited to a Feast [= Little Fox and the Ghost (v. 2)], by Charlie Houghton. For an interlinear text to Little Fox and the Ghost (v. 2), see Winnbago III, #9: 147-159, and Winnebago III, #18: 655-661. For a phonetic text to version 1, see Winnebago III, #5: 69-73; and for an interlinear, see Winnebago I, #7b: 1-40.
147-159
A story about Turtle and a Giant [= Turtle and the Giant], by Charlie Houghton. For another interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #18: 661-661+.
160-162
XXXI. A story about an old man and the Giants [= The Old Man and the Giants], by Charlie Houghton. This is incomplete. For an older copy which is complete, see Winnebago III, #18: 661+ - 675; see also the phonetic text at Winnebago III, #5: 56-59.
163-182

Winnebago III, #10
Freeman #3870
Reel 10

Charles N. Houghton. First speech, second speech. Phonetic text and translation.

Division
pages
Page 1 of the First Speech of Charles N. Houghton. This page is detached from the beginning which is continued at Winnebago III, #18: 676.
675 (1)
The Second Speech of Charles N. Houghton. This is a continuation of the recopied text from Winnebago III, #11a: 324. For the original text, see Winnebago III, #18: 689-696. For a phonetic text only, see Winnebago III, #16: V.1-29.
12-18

Winnebago III, #11a
Freeman #3892
Reel 10

Primarily a collection of stories. Phonetic interlinear texts.

Division
pages
A Sioux Story
1-11
A Mescal Sermon, given by Oliver LaMère
12-26
XXVII. Charlie Houghton, Story of a Giant [A Giant Visits His Daughter], translated by Oliver LaMère. For another text, see Winnebago III, #5: 84-98, and see the text at Winnebago III, #18: 638-643.
27-37
XXVIII. Charlie Houghton, A story about a female were-grizzly [The Were-Grizzly], translated by Oliver LaMère. For other texts, see Winnebago I, #7a, Winnebago III, #5: 60-64, and Winnbago III, #18: 643-649.
38-51
IV. Hog's Adventures, by Charlie Houghton. See the texts at Winnebago III, #5: 65-68, Winnebago III, #18: 643-654, and Winnebago I, #7a: 156-170.
52-62
XII. The Man who Turned into a Fish [= Were-fish (v. 2)], by George Ricehill.
63-64
XIII. The Choke Cherry Wild Cat.
64a-68
XIV. The Fall of the Stars.
69a-69
XV. Tale of the Woman who became a Walnut, titlepage only [story omitted — see below].
70
1. Text and translation of a tale about Little Thunder, by John Fireman, translated by George Ricehill.
71-72
2. Tale of Fireman's Brother, by John Fireman, translated by George Ricehill.
73-74
3. Raymond's Hunting, by John Fireman, translated by George Ricehill.
75-76
4. A tale of Jack-Rabbit & Skunk [= The Boy and the Jack Rabbit], by George Ricehill, translated by George Ricehill.
77-79
5. A tale about a Sioux [= Potato Magic], by George Ricehill, translated by George Ricehill.
80-82
6. The Fish & the Elk Herd [= The Great Fish (v. 2)], by George Ricehill, translated by George Ricehill.
83-84
7. The Story of Migistéga’s Magic, by John Fireman, translated by George Ricehill. See an English translation at Winnebago I, #7a: 33-49.
85-90
8. The Giant, or The Morning Star [= Morning Star and His Friend], by John Harrison, translated by Oliver LaMere.
91-117
9. Story of a Raccoon [= Raccoon and the Blind Men], by John Harrison, translated by Oliver LaMere.
118-124
10. The Struggle between the Son of the Thunderbird and the Son of the Waterspirit [= Traveler and the Thunderbird War]. For another text, see Winnebago V, #3: 1-90.
125-139
The Woman who Became a Walnut Tree (pages reversed; this is the story omitted above).
140a (72), 140b (71)
How an Orphan Conquered Death [= The Resurrection of the Chief's Daughter], by Charlie Houghton, sentences numbered. For an interlinear phonetic text, see Notebook 70.
141-223
The Story of Little Priest [= Little Priest, How He went out as a Soldier], by John Harrison, told June, 1908. Interlinear phonetic text. For an English translation, see Winnebago I, #7a, and for a text with parallel Winnebago and English, see Winnbago III, #5: 74-82.
224-241
Coyote on the Warpath [= Little Fox Goes on the Warpath], by Charlie Houghton, translated by Oliver LaMere. For other texts, see Winnebago III, #18: 313-314, and Winnebago IV, #7i (22).
242-244
How Turtle went on the Warpath [= Turtle's War Party], by Charlie Houghton, translated by Oliver LaMère. A phonetic text with an interlinear translation. For a phonetic text only, see Winnebago III, #5: 101-115, and for another interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #18: 314-360. For another version of this story, see Notebooks 28-29, and Winnebago IV, #8j (typed English only). See the version by Jim Pine at Notebook 26.
245-285*
XXXV. Untitled [= Bladder and His Brothers (v. 2)], by Charlie Houghton.
286-313
First Speech of Charles N. Houghton. This is a recopied version of the MSS found at Winnebago III, #18: 676-689. This copy continues with the Second Speech of Charlie Houghton at Winnebago III, #10: 12. For a phonetic text only of the First Speech, see Winnebago III, #16: IV.1-18.
314 (1) - 324 (11)
*There are two pages numbered "282".

Winnebago III, #11b
Freeman #3892
Reel 10

Clearly written interlinear texts. Incorrectly entitled, "A Tale about Little Thunder".

XVI. A tale about The Stone that Became a Frog, by George Ricehill (1909), recopied and corrected (1945). For another interlinear texts, see Winnebago III, #19c, 16-17.
p. 72
XI. Untitled (Chief of the Horses) [= The Big Eater]. By Frank Ewing (1909), recopied and corrected (1945). For a slightly variant phonetic text without translation, see Winnebago III, #19c.
60-63

Winnebago III, #12
Freeman #3877
Reel 10

How Jasper Blowsnake (title mistakenly says "Sam Blowsnake") joined the Medicine Dance. Typed Winnebago phonetic text only. The initial pages contain complete diacritical marks. [nd] Typed D. 38 pp.

Jasper Blowsnake's account of this rite is set out with revisions in the following notebooks: Winnebago II, #1; Winnebago II, #2; Winnebago II, #5; Winnebago II, #6; Winnebago II, #7; Winnebago III, #1; Winnebago III, #2; Winnebago III, #4; Winnebago III, #6.

Divisions of the Rite and Stories
III, #12
CW
I. Introductory Ceremonies
1. 1-20
-
2. First Night Preceeding the Four Nights Preparation
2.1-5.63
-
3. Second Night Preceeding the Four Nights Preparation
6.1-8.50
-
4. Invitation Rite
9.1-10.30
-
II. The Preparatory Four Nights of the Ancestor-Host Band
11-31
-
First Address of the Ancestor Host
11.1-12.39
-
Myth I. The Shell Anklets Origin Myth (v. 1). For the original interlinear MS, see Winnebago II, #6: 10-15 and Winnebago III, #1: 11). A typewritten phonetic text with a typewritten interlinear translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 21-29. For Version 2, see Winnebago III, #2: XV-XVI.
13.40-14.68
68.1-25
     Revised version of Myth I
14.91-15.68*
69.1a-21a
     Resumption of original version of Myth I
15.69-16.109*
68.25-36a
2. Resumption of the Ancestor-Host speech
16.1-17.24
-
     Conclusion of Myth I (treated as a parenthetical addendum in CW).
16.1-8
69.37-42
Second address of the Ancestor-Host
17.1-18.8
-
Myth II. Keramaniš’aka's Blessing. A typewritten phonetic text with a typewritten interlinear translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 31-34, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 30-33. For the original interlinear MS, see Winnebago II, #6: 17-21.
18.1-20.45
69.1-70.36
Third address of the Ancestor-Host
20.1-11
-
Myth III. The Blessing of Kerexųsaka. A typewritten phonetic text with a typewritten interlinear translation is found at Winnebago II, #5: 36-39, and for a handwritten phonetic text, see Winnebago II, #1: 35-40. For the original interlinear MS, see Winnebago II, #6: 22-28.
21-23†
70.1-71.40
Fourth address of the Ancestor-Host
23
-
3. Second Night
24-26
-
First address of Ancestor-Host (page 31 inserted after page 24)
24-26‡
-
4. Third Night
27-29
-
5. Fourth Night
30-31‡
-
*in the filming of Reel 10, the order of pages 14 and 15 were reversed.
†the sentence numbering stops at sentence 19.
‡page 31 is filmed out of order after page 24.

Winnebago III, #13
Freeman #3869
Reel 11

The Boy who Wished to be Immortal. [nd] D. 6 pp.

The Boy who Wished to be Immortal [= The Boy who would be Immortal], phonetic text, revised. The last page of the phonetic text (lines 36-41) is missing. For the unrevised (interlinear) text, see Notebook 38.
4
Free translation
2

Winnebago III, #14
Freeman #3893
Reel 11

Portions of the Trickster Cycle and the Hare Cycle, told by Jacob Russell. Phonetic text only, paginated in odd numbers. Total pages, 30 [incomplete]. For the syllabic text to the Hare Cycle portion, see Winnebago V, #23.

These stories are told in a very sketchy way, as if there was an assumption that his audience knew the stories well. They were slated for translation by Oliver LaMère, but this apparently was never undertaken.

Trickster stories.
1-26
1. Hare Steals the Fish
27-41
2. Hare is swallowed by a monster, but cuts his way out [= Hare Gets Swallowed, Version 2]
41-49
3. Hare Kills a Man with a Cane, Version 2
49-55
4. Hare Burns His Buttocks, Version 3 (incomplete)
55-59

Winnebago III, #15
Freeman #3880
Reel 11

XVI. The Man who Turned into a Fish, by George Ricehill, translated by Oliver LaMère. Double spaced phonetic text only: 41-65 (paginated with odd numbers only).


Winnebago III, #16
Freeman #3873
Reel 11

First Speech of Charles Houghton, Second Speech of Charles Houghton. Double spaced phonetic text only.

IV. First Speech of Charles Houghton. For the original interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #10: 675 and Winnebago III, #18: 676-689. For a recopied version of this speech, see Winnebago III, #11a: 314-324.
1-18
V. Second Speech of Charles Houghton. For the original text, see Winnebago III, #18: 689-696. For a recopied version of this speech, see Winnebago III, #10: 12-18.
1-29

Winnebago III, #17
Freeman #3867
Reel 11

Aleck Lonetree (Nąínek'iga) story [= A Man's Revenge]. Phonetic text with interlinear translation, 1-19. For a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #8b: 1052-1056.


Winnebago III, #18
Freeman #3900
Reel 11

Winnebago texts, 1908 (ca. 160 pp.).

Charlie Houghton's Second Speech, p. 309. This page follows p. 689 below. It is followed by p. 310 (= 703b).
(629)
Note on Bourbon vaccination policy
1
Partial contents
1
XXVI. Charlie Houghton, Turtle and the Merchant. For a phonetic text only, see Winnebago I, #7a: 151-169. For other interlinear texts, see Winnebago III, #5: 93-98, and Winnebago III, #9: 132-146.
630-637
Charlie Houghton, A man and his Giant father-in-law [= A Giant Visits His Daughter]. For another text, see Winnebago III, #5: 84-98, for an interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 98-107.
638-643
XXVIII. Charlie Houghton, The little girl and the cannibal old woman [= The Were-Grizzly]. For an interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 108-131, and see the phonetic text at Winnebago III, #5: 60-64; see also Winnebago I, #7a.
643-649
XXIX. Charlie Houghton, Hog's Adventures. See the texts at Winnebago III, #5: 65-68, Winnebago I, #7a: 156-170, and Winnebago III, #11a: 121-131.
649-654
XXX. Charlie Houghton, Little Fox and the Corpse [= Little Fox and the Ghost (v. 2)]. For this version, see the interlinear text at Winnebago III, #9: 147-159. For a text of the published variant ending, see Winnebago I, #7b: 1-40 (?) and Winnebago III, #5: 69-73.
655-661
Charlie Houghton, Turtle and the Giant. For an interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #9: 160-162.
661-661+ [sic]
XXXI. Charlie Houghton, complete version of the Old Man and the Giants story — for other texts, see Winnebago III, #5: 56-59 and Winnebago III, #9: 163-182.
661+ - 675
First Speech of Charlie Houghton. Page 675 (1) is inserted at the beginning of Winnebago III, #10. For a recopied version of this speech, see Winnebago III, #11a: 314-324, and Winnebago III, #16: IV.1-18 (phonetic text only).
676 (2) - 689 (15)
Second Speech of Charlie Houghton. Last page says, "continued on p. 309." For p. 309, see p. 629 above. For a recopied version of this speech, see Winnebago III, #10: 12-18, and Winnebago III, #16: V.1-29 (phonetic text only).
689 (15) - 696 (22)
Seasonal and lunar terms
692/3
Days of the week
693/4
Medicine Dance, told by James Smith and Thomas Clay; has "75" written at the top of the page. This is the The Medicine Rite Foundation Myth (v. 1). See the texts at Winnebago I, #7a: 203-287, Winnbago II, #4: 1-123, and Winnebago III, #5: 1-55 (phonetic only).
697-741
     Page 310 of the Second Speech of Charlie Houghton above.
(703b)
     Page 311 of the Second Speech of Charlie Houghton above.
(703c)
     Page 312 of the Second Speech of Charlie Houghton above.
(742)
XXXIV. Charlie Houghton, Coyote [Little Fox] on the Warpath [= Little Fox Goes on the Warpath]. For other texts, see Winnebago III, #11a: 242-244, and Winnebago IV, #7i (22).
313-314
XXXV. Charlie Houghton, Turtle Goes on the Warpath [= Turtle's War Party]. A phonetic interlinear text. For a phonetic text without translation, see Winnebago III, #5: 101-115, and for another interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 245-285. For another version of this story, see Notebooks 28-29, with a typed English translation at Winnebago IV, #8j. See the version by Jim Pine at Notebook 26.
314-360

Winnebago III, #19a
Freeman #3899 [1254]
Reel 11

Deer Clan Origin Myth (v. 1). Phonetic interlinear text. Described as, "Winnebago texts partly published in English". 13 pp.


Winnebago III, #19b
Freeman #3899 [1254]
Reel 11

Phonetic interlinear texts.

Burial customs, related by Tom Big Bear.
14-17
Very short notes on adoption by Tom Big Bear
17
Untitled story about Omahas who turned into snakes [= The Omahas who turned into Snakes], by George Ricehill.
17-20

Winnebago III, #19c
Freeman #3899 [1254]
Reel 11

Phonetic texts.

Handwritten titlepage for "The Orphan who Brought the Chief's Daughter Back to Life". No text follows it.
1
Handwritten titlepage for "The Boy who Ate too Much"
2
Fragment of an historical or legendary text, interlinear translation
3
Untitled [= Brave Man Gambles] by Frank Ewing. Elsewhere attributed to Charlie Houghton — see Winnebago I, # 7a: 131.
4-8
Story of the Boy who Ate too Much, told by Frank Ewing — this is the phonetic text to the story also known as "Chief of Horses" [= The Big Eater]. For the English translation, see Winnebago III, #11b, Story XI.
9-14
The Stone who Turned into a Frog [= The Stone that Became a Frog], by George Ricehill. 12 lines of Hočąk text. For a corrected interlinear text, see , see Winnebago III, #11b, Story XVI, 72.
16-17

Winnebago III, #19d
Freeman #3899 [1254]
Reel 11

Neatly written phonetic text only. Sweat bath ritual: 1-2.


Winnebago III, #19e
Freeman #3899 [1254]
Reel 11

Phonetic text only. The Seer: 1-5. For a phonetic interlinear text, see Notebook 71.


Winnebago IV, #1
Freeman #3851
Reel 11

Hare Cycle [nd] D. 156 pp. English text only.

Episodes
MS pages
Tr pages
§1. Hare Acquires His Arrows
1-13
63-65
§2. Hare and the Grasshoppers
13-17
65-66
§3. Hare Kills Flint
17-21
66-67
§4. Hare Kills Sharp Elbow
21-35
67-70
§5. Hare Visits His Grandfather Bear
36-44
70-71
§6. Grandmother Packs the Bear Meat
44-48
71-72
§7. Hare Visits the Bodiless Heads
48-59
72-74
§8. Hare Kills a Man with a Cane
59-65
74-75
§9. Hare Burns His Buttocks
65-69
75-76
§10. Hare Gets Swallowed
69-77
76-78
§11. Hare Kills Wildcat
77-91
78-80
§12. Hare and the Dangerous Frog
91-96
80-81
§13. Hare Retrieves a Stolen Scalp
96-134
81-87
§14. Hare Recruits Game Animals for Humans
134-150
87-90
§15. The Necessity for Death
151-156*
90-91
*two different pages are both numbered "154".

Winnebago IV, #2
Freeman #3857
Reel 11

The Shawnee Prophet as Heard by the Winnebago [= The Shawnee Prophet — What He Told the Hočągara]. [nd] D. 39 pp. English version only.


Winnebago IV, #3
Freeman #3855
Reel 11

Origin of the Buffalo Clan. [nd] D. 19 pp. English version only.


Winnebago IV, #4
Freeman #3859
Reel 11

The Story of the Holy One [= Holy One and His Brother], [nd]. Typed D. 17 pp. (59-77). English version only. Numerous handwritten corrections. For the original Hočąk syllabic text, see Winnebago V, #24: 1-51.


Winnebago IV, #5
Freeman #3858
Reel 11

Untitled [= The Green Man], [nd]. Typed D. 13 pp. (4-16). English version, completes the incomplete MS version of Notebook 55.


Winnebago IV, #6
Freeman #3853
Reel 11

A Man and His Three Dogs, [nd]. D. 7 pp. and duplicate. English text only. Version with handwritten corrections: pp. 143-147; followed by final corrected version.


Winnebago IV, #7
Freeman #3860
Reel 11

Transcripts in English of Winnebago Tales [1908-1930]. D. 149 pp. 15 tales, some with carbon copies. Typed.

7a. Redhorn's Nephews [= Redhorn's Sons, covers same ground as Redhorn Cycle, but is a shorter variant]. For the original handwritten translation, see Notebook 34; for another typed version, see Winnebago IV, #8k.
1-16
7b. Mázeniabera (Mązenį'ąbara) [= How the Thunders Met the Nights], followed by a copy.
1-12
7c. Wears White Feather on His Head, followed by 2 copies. For the original handwritten version, see Notebook 4.
1-7
7d. The Auk [= The Markings on the Moon], followed by a copy. For a MS text, see Notebook 46; see also Winnebago IV, #9.
1-5
7e. The Big Stone, followed by a copy. For another English typed copy, see Winnebago IV, #8h; for the original handwritten English translation, see Notebook 35.
1-7
7f. Coon Skin Coat [= The Raccoon Coat]. For another typed copy, see Winnebago IV, #8q.
1-22
7g. How White Thunder Killed Two Chippeway [= White Thunder's Warpath], heavily corrected, followed by a corrected copy.
159-161
7h. The Story of Big Walker [= Great Walker's Warpath], followed by a first draft with corrections on it.
1-7
7i. Short Stories, typed, followed by an earlier corrected typed version:
-
     17. The Boy and the Jack Rabbit.
1
     18. The Elk Crossing the Stream [= The Great Fish, Version 2].
1
     19. The Man who Turned into a Fish — see Winnebago III, #15 (phonetic text).
1
     20. The Wildcat that was Shot by Chokeberries [= The Choke Cherry Wild Cat].
1-2
     21. The Fall of the Stars.
2
     22. Coyote on the Warpath [= Little Fox Goes on the Warpath]. For other texts, see      Winnebago III, #11a: 242-244, and Winnebago III, #18: 313-314.
2
7j. The Young Woman who Married a Snake [= The Woman who Married a Snake]. Hand corrected draft. For a MS in English, see Winnebago IV, #8x.
1090-1092
7k and 7l are out of order and appear after 7o below.
-
7m. Spearhandle and Lacrosse [= Spear Shaft and Lacrosse], followed by a copy. See Notebook 36.
1-13
7n. The Dipper. For the original syllabic text with interlinear translation, see Notebook 50; for a typewritten version of the translation, see Winnebago IV, #8r.
1-26
7o. The Red Man, followed by a copy. For the original handwritten translation, see Notebook 6.
1-12
7k. The Reincarnated Grizzly Bear, with penciled corrections.
105-110
7l. The Sun [= Sun and the Big Eater], with numerous penciled corrections.
1-9

Winnebago IV, #8a
Freeman #3891
Reel 11

Table of Contents of Winnebago Tales, [ca. 1930]. D. 3 pp. Indicates text, whether typed or untyped. Cf. Radin's field notebooks. 96 tales listed.


Winnebago IV, #8b-z
Freeman #3861 [3891]
Reel 11

Transcripts of Winnebago texts [nd, before 1930, texts 1908]. Typed D. 260 pp. 26 texts. Table of contents listing them as typed, untyped, and text.

8b. Man Avenges His Wife [= A Man's Revenge]. For a phonetic interlinear text, see Winnebago III, #17: 1-19.
1052-1056
8c. Coyote and the Ghost [= Little Fox and the Ghost]. (Which version ?)
997-1001
8d. How Big Thunder Taught His Grandson Čap’ósgaga to Go on the Warpath [= Big Thunder Teaches Čap’ósgaga the Warpath], 2 copies. For a typed phonetic text with an interlinear translation, see Notebook 66, Story 6: 1-4.
1082-1084, 1-4
8e. Crane [= Crane and His Brothers], 3 copies. For a syllabic text with an interlinear translation, see Notebook 48.
1-5
8[e/f] = 8t. The Woman who Loved Her Half-Brother. For another text, see Notebook 1; and for another copy of the typed translation, see 8t below.
1-4
8f. Wolves & Humans [= Wolves and Humans], 2 copies. For a syllabic text without translation, see Winnebago V, #19: 1-40. For the original handwritten English translation, see Notebook 5.
1-6
8g. White Wolf, 2 copies. For the original handwritten translation, see Notebook 10.
1-10
8h. The Big Stone, 2 copies. For another English typed copy, see Winnebago IV, #7e; for the original handwritten English translation, see Notebook 35.
1-8
8i. The Bladder [= Bladder and His Brothers (v. 1)], 2 copies.*
1-12
8j. Turtle's Warpath [= Turtle's War Party]. For the handwritten English translation, see Notebooks 28-29. For versions by Charlie Houghton, see the following texts: Winnebago III, #5: 101-115, Winnebago III, #11a:245-285, Winnebago III, #18: 314-360. For a phonetic interlinear version by Jim Pine, see Notebook 26.
1-22
8k. Redhorn's Nephews [= Redhorn's Sons]. For the original handwritten translation, see Notebook 34; for another typed version, see Winnebago IV, #7a.
1-16
8l. The Porcupine [= Porcupine and His Brothers], 2 copies. For the original handwritten translation, see Notebook 11.
1-7
8m. Partridge's Older Brother, 2 copies. For the syllabic text, see Winnebago V, #9; for the handwritten translation, see Notebook 7.
1-11
8n. Trickster Myth [= Baldheaded Warclub Origin Myth], 2 copies, English only. For an English text, see Notebook 37.
1-10
8o. The Thunderbird, 2 copies. For a syllabic text with an interlinear translation, see Notebook 16.
1-12
8p. The Man who Visited the Thunderbirds [= Waruǧápara], by Joseph LaMère. For the handwritten translation, see Winnebago I, #7a.
890-906
8q. Wears Coon Skin Coat [= The Raccoon Coat], 3 copies. For another typed copy, see Winnebago IV, #7f. See Notebook 59.
1-20
8r. The Dipper, 3 copies, the last of which has parenthetical pagination for the syllabic text.† For the original syllabic text with interlinear translation, see Notebook 50; for a typewritten version of the translation, see Winnebago IV, #7n.
1-26
8s. Young Man Shoots for Them Often [= Young Man Gambles Often], 3 copies, last is 9 pp. only. The original syllabic text with interlinear translation is found in Winnebago V, #22, 1-173; a handwritten translation is found in Notebook 56.
1-23
8t. The Woman who Loved Her Half-Brother, 3 copies. For the orginal handwritten translation, see Notebook 1; for another typed English copy, see 8e/f above.
1-3 =
1048-1051
8u. Trickster Soils the Princess, 2 copies. For a syllabic text without translation, see Winnebago V, #18; for an interlinear text, see Notebook 47.
1-13
8v. Wojijé, 2 copies. See Notebook 62.
1-8
8w. Joseph LaMère, The Orphan Boy who was Captured by the Bad Thunderbirds [= The Boy who was Captured by the Bad Thunderbirds]. For another English text, see Winnebago I, #7a.
907-910
8x. The Young Woman who Married a Snake [= The Woman who Married a Snake]. For an English typed text, see Winnebago IV, #7j.
1-3
8y. Soloman Longtail, How the Two Divisions of the Winnebago Came Together [= Moiety Origin Myth]
1031-1039
8z. Boy who was Blessed by a Mountain Lion, 2 copies
1-9
*copy 1 has two pages numbered "4".
†copy 1 has a complete text, but skips page number 22.

Winnebago IV, #9
Freeman #3854
Reel 11

Miscellaneous Winnebago Papers. [nd] D. 21 pp. and 6 slips. English translations only.

6 lexical slips
4
The Auk [= The Markings on the Moon]. See Winnebago IV, #7, and for a MS text, see Notebook 46.
5 pp.
Blue Horn’s Nephews [typed, missing 1-2; concludes prematurely on p. 68 of the pagination given in Notebook 58]. For a MS text, see Notebook 58.
3 - 12

Winnebago V, # 1
Freeman #3897
Reel 6b

Sam Blowsnake’s Autobiography (said to be Jasper Blowsnake's autobiography), Notebooks 30-32. Winnebago Syllabary with accompanying transliteration, except for 172-323, which is syllabary only. Each notebook is dated Oct. 9, 1913.

Notebook 30. Two pages inserted after 109 with sums and miscellaneous notes.
1-109
Notebook 31
110-218
Notebook 32
219-323

Winnebago V, # 2
Freeman #3897
Reel 6b

Three Twins stories. Syllabic texts followed by English translations.

Stories
Syllabary
English trs.
The Twins Retrieve Red Star's Head
1-123
1-38
The Lost Blanket
123-247*
38-71
The Two Boys
247-379†
71-108
*page 202 has been labeled as "201", but the next page is 203.
†there are two page 261's, the second one of which is differented as "261+".

Winnebago V, # 3
Freeman #3897
Reel 6b

The syllabic text of Hikiwaregega [= Traveler and the Thunderbird War], 1-90. For another text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 126-139.


Winnebago V, # 4
Freeman #3897
Reel 6b

Origin of the Thunderbird Clan [= Thunderbird Clan Origin Myth (v. 1)], Syllabary only, 1-38. Published in English translation in WT, 164-168.


Winnebago V, # 5
Freeman #3897
Reel 6b

Untitled Text. Syllabary with interlinear translation. Spiritland Myth [= Ghost Dance Origin Myth I], 3-60; first 2 pp missing, the page before 51 is designated "51a". For the missing pages, see Winnebago V, # 8. Published as “The Man who Retrieved His Wife from Spiritland.”


Winnebago V, # 6
Freeman #3897
Reel 6b

Honaixigiji (?). Advice on marriage, warfare, naming of children (to a Thunder clansman?). This appears to be a second part to Blowsnake's Teachings, see Winnebago V, #12.

Teachings given to children. Syllabary with interlinear translation.
123-130, 128-130*
Teachings given to children. Phonetic text with interlinear translation.
131-135
*the second set of pages duplicate some of the numbers of the first set (without duplicating their content).

Winnebago V, # 7
Freeman #3897
Reel 6b

Trickster (Wakjąkaga) Cycle. Syllabic text and interlinear translation, 1-586.

Story Title
MS pages
Tr pages
§1. Trickster's Warpath
1-27
4-7
§2. Trickster's Buffalo Hunt
27-37
7-8
§3. Trickster and the Children
37-71
8-11
§4. Trickster's Adventures in the Ocean
71-93
11-13
§5. The Pointing Man
93-104
13-14
§6. Trickster's Anus Guards the Ducks
104-151*
14-18
§7. Trickster's Penis
151-171
18-20
§8. The Abduction and Rescue of Trickster
172-186
20-21
§9. Trickster Gets Pregnant
186-225
21-24
§10. Trickster Visits His Family
225-230
24-25
§11. Trickster Eats the Laxative Bulb
230-269
25-28
§12. Trickster and the Mothers
269-307†
28-31
§13. Trickster Loses His Meal
307-317
31-32
§14. The Elk's Skull
318-349
32-35
§15. Trickster's Tail
349-364
35-36
§16. A Mink Tricks Trickster
364-378
36-38
§17. Trickster Loses Most of His Penis
378-404
38-40
§18. The Scenting Contest
404-413
40-41
§19. The Bungling Host
413-538
41-49
§20. Mink Soils the Princess
538-548
49-50
§21. Trickster Takes Little Fox for a Ride
548-566
50-52
§22. Trickster Concludes His Mission (concludes short of the ending)
566-586
52-53
*page 117 is filmed after page 141.
†there are two pages numbered "284".

Winnebago V, # 8
Freeman #3897
Reel 6b

Phonetic texts with partial interlinear translations. Pages are out of order.

Thunderbird Clan Origin Myth (v. 3). Phonetic text, partial interlinear translation.
23-26
Hawk (Wonáǧire Wąkšik) Clan Origin Myth. Phonetic text, partial interlinear translation. Continued below.
36-37
Spiritland Myth [= Ghost Dance Origin Myth I] — see Winnebago V, # 5 for other pages.
1-2
Second Ghost Dance myth [= Ghost Dance Origin Myth II], phonetic text, only first page is interlinear.
14-37
Hawk (Wonáǧire Wąkšik) Clan Origin Myth, continued. Phonetic text, partial interlinear translation. Published in WT, 170-172.
38-41
A song of the Hawk Clan
41

Winnebago V, #9
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Partridge's Older Brother, syllabic text only, 1-61. For a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #8m; for the handwritten translation, see Notebook 7.


Winnebago V, #10
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Syllabic text, 22-25. These pages are from the syllabic text of The Man's Head at Winnebago V, #13: 1-21, 26-61 [= Little Human Head]. For the English translation, see Notebook 51.


Winnebago V, #11
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Sam Blowsnake, Waretcáwera (the Twins Cycle, Version 1). Interlinear syllabary. The style shows that from at least pages 1-194, it was translated by John Baptiste.

§1. The Birth of the Twins
1-54*
§2. The Twins Disobey Their Father
54-129
§3. The Father of the Twins Attempts to Flee
129-163
§4. The Twins Get into Hot Water
164-200†
§5. The Twins Visit Their Father's Village
200-223
§6. The Twins Join Redhorn's Warparty
223-251
§7. Earthmaker Sends Rušewe to the Twins
251-284
*page 23 is filmed between pages 26 and 27.
†from page 194 on, the handwriting of the English translation changes and is reduced somewhat in size.

Winnebago V, #12
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Blowsnake's Teachings. Interlinear syllabary, 1-120. For more of this, see Winnebago V, #6.


Winnebago V, #13
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

The Man's Head (Wąkpanįka) [= Little Human Head]. Syllabary without translation, 1-61, missing pages 22-25. Pages 22-25 of the syllabic text are found at Winnebago V, #10. For the English translation, see Notebook 51.


Winnebago V, #14
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Téjąniǧega (Téją-wįx-e-ga) [= Ocean Duck]. Syllabary without translation, 1-77. For the English text, see Notebook 13.


Winnebago V, #15
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

The Hairy Man [= The Shaggy Man]. Syllabary without translation, 1-89. For an interlinear text, see Notebook 9.


Winnebago V, #16
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Wuwuk(i)higa [= The Mulberry Picker]. Syllabary without translation, 1-67. For an interlinear text, see Notebook 45.


Winnebago V, #17
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Winnebago Contact with the French, published in WT 17-21. At the end, the name "Decorah" is written in Latin cursive. Syllabary without translation, 1-34. Pages 1-6, and 14-22, are the story of the First Contact; pages 6-14 are the Tobacco Origin Myth, Version 1; pages 22-34 are the Origin of the Decorah Family.


Winnebago V, #18
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Trickster Dirties the Princess [= Trickster Soils the Princess]. Syllabary without translation, 1-80. For an interlinear text, see Notebook 47, for a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #8u.


Winnebago V, #19
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Šųkjąkega (Wolf) [= Wolves and Humans]. Syllabary without translation, 1-40. For the original handwritten English translation, see Notebook 5; for a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #8f.


Winnebago V, #20
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Thunderbird Clan Feast. Syllabary without translation, 1-87. English translation published in WT 486-502.

Earthmaker Blesses Wagíšega (v. 1). Syllabary without translation, 75-78. English translation published in WT 497.


Winnebago V, #21
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Buffalo Dance. Very clear syllabary without translation, 1-35. Published WT 296-297, 299.


Winnebago V, #22
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

Young Man Gambles Often (Ao tti tti w Kio Ke K = Hočįčįwaki’ųk’ega). Syllabary without translation, 1-173. For Part I in a handwritten translation, see Notebook 56; for the typed translation, see Winnebago IV, #8s.


Winnebago V, #23
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

These are texts from a Hare Cycle of unknown provenience. Syllabary without translation, 135-157.

1. Hare Recruits Game Animals for Humans (v. 2)
135-144
2. Medicine Rite Foundation Myth (v. 2)
144-145
3. Hare Establishes the Bear Hunt (v. 1)
145-151
4. The Necessity of Death (v. 3)
151-157

Winnebago V, #24
Freeman #3897
Reel 6a

The Four Nights' Wake. Also labeled "Flood Myth" and "Story of the flood and origin of spirit home." At the top of the page: "This has nothing to do with the flood myth. cf. below. Copies*" At the bottom of the page: *cf. B. A. E. 37: 140-144 [= WT 93-96, 98].

Contents
pages
WT pages
The Four Nights' Wake of the Thunderbird Clan, syllabic text.
52-82
93-96
Funeral practices of the Thunderbird Clan.
83-87
98
Hųj Hikikarajra, syllabic text [= Bear Clan Origin Myth (v. 8)].
88-100
186-187
Story of the Flood and Origin of the Spirit Home [= Holy One and His Brother], syllabic text, without translation. For the English translation, see Winnebago IV, #4: 1-17.
1-51
-
The Four Nights' Wake, English translation.
52-82
93-96
Funeral practices of the Thunderbird Clan, English translation.
83-87
98
Hųj Hikikarajra, English translation [= Bear Clan Origin Myth (v. 8)].
88-100
186-187

Winnebago VI, #2
Freeman #3852
Reel 12

The Legend of the Mother of All the Earth. This is Fox, Sauk, or Kickapoo, but definitely not Hočąk.

Contents
pages
Legend of the Mother of All the Earth, Freeman #3852. Typed, English only.
1-519*
*there is no page 149.

Winnebago Notebooks, Nos. 1 through 19
Freeman #3850, #3896, #3897
Reel 12

Notebook Contents
pages
Notebook 1 The Woman who Loved Her Half-Brother. Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only. For a typed English version, see Winnebago IV, #8e/f and Winnebago IV, #8t.
1-11
Notebook 2 The Roaster. Written in pencil but not in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only.
1-45
Notebook 3 Ethnological Notes, various subjects. Written in pencil.
21 pp.
Notebook 4 Wears White Feather on His Head (m doAo rK A Ke se K. = Mąšųska-hakerega). For a typed version, see Winnebago IV, #7c: 1-7. Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only.
1-50*
Notebook 5 Wolves [= Wolves and Humans]. Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only; for the typed version, see Winnebago IV, #8f. For the syllabic text, see Winnebago V, #19: 1-40.
1-40
Notebook 6 The Red Man. Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only. For the typewritten version of the translation, see Winnebago IV, #7o: 1-12.
1-72
Notebook 7 Partridge's Older Brother. Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only. For the syllabic text, see Winnebago V, #9; for a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #8m.
1-61
Notebook 8 The Morning Star [= Grandfather's Two Families] (Wiragošge Xetera). Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only.
1-93†
Notebook 9 The Hairy Man [= The Shaggy Man], (wK Ai deAe deAe K = Wąk-hišešega). Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only. For a syllabic text, see Winnebago V, #15.
1-89
Notebook 10 White Wolf. Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only. For a typed version of the translation, see Winnebago IV, #8g.
1-64
Notebook 11 The Porcupine [= Porcupine and His Brothers], (w xA Ai K = Waxahiga). Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only. For a typed English version, see Winnebago IV, #8l.
1-43
Notebook 12 Brother and Sister, a Twins Myth (Hąpwira Hinįkwahira) [= The Children of the Sun]. Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only.
1-56
Notebook 13 Ocean Duck (te tt wi xe K = Tejąwįǧega). Written in pencil in the hand of Oliver LaMère. English only. For the syllabic text, see Winnebago V, #14.
1-77
Notebook 14 Inčohorušika [= Įčorúšika and His Brothers]. Syllabary with interlinear translation.
1-67
Notebook 15 Rave's Account of the Peyote Cult. A phonetic interlinear text written in pencil. For another interlinear text, see Winnebago I, #1.
36 pp.
Notebook 16 The Thunderbird. Unnumbered pages written in pencil in syllabary with an interlinear translation. For a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #8o.
1-103
Notebook 17 The Story of Thunder-Bird and White Horse [= Thunderbird and White Horse], by Rufus Tiver. Phonetic text with interlinear translation written in pencil. Poor legibility.
1-24‡
Notebook 18 Note on Lightning, and the story Kaǧiga.
1-9
     Note on Lightning
1

     Kaǧiga ("Crow" or "Raven") [= Kaǧiga and Lone Man]. Phonetic text
     
with an interlinear translation.

1-9
Notebook 19 Three stories. Phonetic texts with partial interlinear translations. Written in pencil.
1-39
     Shakes the Earth (Manáksųčnįka), by James StCyr, from a story related by      a Frenchman.
1-18
     Fleetfooted Man Captured by the Thunderbirds [= The Fleetfooted Man],      by James StCyr, from a story related by a Frenchman.
18-33
     Untitled [= The Boy who Flew], told by a Frenchman to John Michael
     StCyr.
33-39
*the page number "16" was omitted.
†there are two pages numbered "64".
‡there are two pages numbered "14".

Winnebago Notebooks, Nos. 20 through 52
Freeman #3850, #3896, #3897
Reel 13

Notebook Contents
pages
Notebook 20 Deer Ankle Smelling Feet [= Eats the Stinking Part of the Deer Ankle]. Syllabary with interlinear translation.
1-146*
Notebook 21 Mązeniabera (Mązeni'ąbara, "Live Iron") [= How the Thunders Met the Nights]. Syllabary with interlinear translation.
1-134
Notebook 22 The Squirrel [= The Brown Squirrel]. Syllabary with interlinear translation.
1-85
Notebook 23 Sore-Eye Dance (Hišjaxiri Waši) by Jasper Blowsnake. [“Published in English version in Winnebago Monograph” (WT 281-295)]. Syllabary with an interlinear translation. For a phonetic text, see Notebook 69.
1-195
     Battle of the Night Blessed Men and the Medicine Rite Men (WT 295)
192-195
Notebook 24 Bear Feast. [“Published in English Translation in Winnebago Monograph” (WT 184-186)]. Phonetic text with an interlinear translation. For a phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #7.
1-19
     Bear Clan Origin Myth [= Bear Clan Origin Myth, Version 7]
1-11
     Feast (Wahona)
11-19
Notebook 25 Prophecies and Fasters’ Feast. (unpaginated) [“Published in English Translation in Winnebago Monograph”]. Phonetic text with an interlinear translation.
1-15
     Prophesies (Hokík'ų) (WT 25-26)
1-2
     Fasters' Feast (Hąčaginąč Waru-íčanéną)
3-15
Notebook 26 Five stories by Jim Pine (all untitled); John Rave’s grandparents [“Published in English Translation in Winnebago Monograph” (WT); but there is a handwritten note: “Don’t think this is published, XII,1,58 - R Gm.”]. Phonetic texts, each with an interlinear translation.
237-284
     The Canine Warrior
237-240
     Fighting Retreat
240-244
     Turtle's Warparty (v. 3). For a other versions, see Winnebago III, #5:
     101-115, Winnebago III, #11a:245-285, Winnebago III, #18: 314-360,      Winnebago IV, #8j, Notebooks 28-29.
244-250
     The Man Whose Wife was Captured
250-260
     Bluehorn Rescues His Sister
261-284
     John Rave's Grandmother. For a phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #8.
1-5
     John Rave's Grandfather. For a phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #8.
6-10
Notebook 27 The Bladder [= Bladder and His Brothers, Version 1]. Syllabic text with English translation on alternate pages.
1-60
Notebook 28 Turtle's War Party (Part I) (continuous pagination with Part II). English only.
1-74
Notebook 29 Turtle's War Party (Part II). English only; for the typed version of the translation, see Winnebago IV, #8j. For another version by Charlie Houghton, see the following texts: Winnebago III, #5: 101-115 (phonetic text only), Winnebago III, #11a:245-285 (phonetic interlinear), Winnebago III, #18: 314-360 (phonetic interlinear). For a phonetic interlinear version by Jim Pine, see Notebook 26.
75-143
Notebook 30 = Winnebago V, #1: 1-109
-
Notebook 31 = Winnebago V, #1: 110-218
-
Notebook 32 = Winnebago V, #1: 219-323
-
Notebook 33 The Chief of the Heroka. Written in pencil in a cursive hand in English only.
1-66
Notebook 34 Red Horn Cycle (Redhorn's Nephews) [= Redhorn's Sons]. This is an unusual version of the Redhorn Cycle which does not have the initial episode, "The Race for the Chief's Daughter" or the concluding episode, "The Seduction of the Son of Redhorn". Written in pencil in English only. For typed versions, see Winnebago IV, #7a, and Winnebago IV, #8k.
1-117
Notebook 35 The Big Stone. Handwritten in English only. For a typescript, see Winnebago IV, #7e. For another English typed copy, see Winnebago IV, #8h.
1-44
Notebook 36 Spearhead and Lacrosse [= Spear Shaft and Lacrosse]. English only. For a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #7m.
1-81
Notebook 37 A Wakjonkaga Myth [= Baldheaded Warclub Origin Myth]. English only. For a typewritten English text, see Winnebago IV, #8n.
1-70**
Notebook 38 The Boy who would be Immortal. Phonetic text with an interlinear translation; published in PMP. For the revised phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #13.
210-215
Notebook 39 Aračgega [= Aračgéga's Blessings]. Phonetic text with an interlinear translation; English translation published in Winnebago Monograph (WT, 248-250). For another phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #8.
1-13
Notebook 40 Buffalo Clan Feast (Če Wagigara). Phonetic text with an English interlinear translation; English translation published in Winnebago Monograph (WT.
1-15
Notebook 41 War Bundle Feast of Bear Clan. Published in English translation in WT, 499-502.
17 pp.
     Diagram of the seating of the spirit-impersonators, by John Rave
-
     Spirit emblems on sacrificial deerskin
-
     Diagram of clan seating
-
     War Bundle Feast of Bear Clan
1-14
Notebook 42 Ceremonial Lacrosse. Phonetic text with an English interlinear translation; English translation published in Winnebago Monograph (WT,142). Unpaginated. Last page is an account of prophesies written in English.
6 pp.
Notebook 43 Four Nights’ Wake. Phonetic text with an English interlinear translation. [= The Four Slumbers Origin Myth]. Published in CW 12-46.
1-62
Notebook 44 The Daughter-in-Law's Jealousy. English only.
1-74
Notebook 45 Wuwukihiga (mistranscribed as Wuwukhige). [= The Mulberry Picker]. English only. For the syllabic text, see Winnebago V, #16.
1-67
Notebook 46 The Auk [= The Markings on the Moon]. English only. For a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #7d; see also Winnebago IV, #9.
1-22
Notebook 47 Trickster Soils the Princess. [“Only one part ever sent me.” Handwritten note: “Is there a second part?”]. English only. For the syllabic text, see Winnebago V, #18, for a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #8u.
1-80
Notebook 48 The Crane [= Crane and His Brothers] (leAe tt K = Pejąga). Syllabary with interlinear translation. For a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #8e: 1-5. On page 26, the handwriting changes from Jasper to Sam Blowsnake.
1-41‡
Notebook 49 The Dipper (Part I) (continuous pagination with Part II). Syllabary with interlinear translation.
1-131†
Notebook 50 The Dipper (Part II) (continuous pagination with Part I). Syllabary with interlinear translation. For typewritten versions of the translation, see Winnebago IV, #7n, and Winnebago IV, #8r.
132-267††
Notebook 51 The Man's Head [= Little Human Head] (wK p ni K = Wąkpanįka). English only with pagination parallel to the syllabic texts. For the syllabic texts, see Winnebago V, #13: 1-21, 26-61, and Winnebago V, #10: 22-25.
1-61
Notebook 52 The Woman Who Became an Ant. English only.
1-61
*there is no page numbered "133"
**Radin failed to number page 21.
‡there is no page numbered "33".
†page 130 has been omitted from the microfilming.
††there are two pages numbered "183".

Winnebago Notebooks, Nos. 53 through 79.
Freeman #3850, #3896, #3897
Reel 14

Notebook Contents
pages
Notebook 53 The Old Man and His Grandson [= Old Man and Wears White Feather]. Syllabary with an interlinear translation.
1-107
Notebook 54 A second version of Turtle and the Merchant (last part only): 1-49 missing. Misleadingly entitled, "Trickster Exploit". English translation only, original syllabic text is missing. Part of this is presented as the story Soft Shelled Turtle Gets Married. The English translation to pp. 4-7 of the missing half of this story is found at Winnebago I, #3: 26. For Charlie Houghton's version of Turtle and the Merchant, see Winnebago III, #9: 132-146 and allied texts cited there.
50-134
Notebook 55 The Blue (or Green) Man. [= The Green Man]. MS not fully copied. For the remainder of the English text, see Winnebago IV, #5.
1-72
Notebook 56 Young Man Shoots for Them Often [= Young Man Gambles Often (Part I)]. For a syllabic text with interlinear translation, see Winnebago V, #22: 1-173; for a typewritten version of the translation, see Winnebago IV, #8s.
1-85
Notebook 57 The Esoteric Hare Cycle: The Origin Myth of the Medicine Dance (Published in WT 302-311; and in CT ...). This is an offprint of a published article, in English only. [= The Medicine Rite Foundation Myth]
51-66
Notebook 58 Blue Horn’s Nephews. (Missing its ending). The pagination reflects that of a missing syllabic text. Between pp. 107 and 108 of Coon Skin Fur Coat [= The Raccoon Coat], Notebook 59, is the lost ending: 104-107 inserted as a loose page. For a typed text (without a beginning and extending only to p. 68), see Winnebago IV, #9.
1-104,
104-107
Notebook 59 Coon Skin Fur Coat [= The Raccoon Coat]. Inserted as a loose page between pp. 107 and 108 is the lost ending from Notebook 58 directly above. For typed English translations, see Winnebago IV, #7f and Winnebago IV, #8q.
1-122
Notebook 60 Snowshoe Strings. Phonetic text with an interlinear translation.
1-29*
Notebook 61 Story of Three Blessings (from Jasper Blowsnake’s Grandmother) [= Ancient Blessing].
1
James Blackhawk tells of his grandfather
2-3
Story [= The Annihilation of the Hočągara I (v. 1)] (page 4 missing). For the first part of this story, see Winnebago I, #3: 30-33.
5-6
Notebook 62 Wajiji [= Wojijé]. For a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV, #8v.
1-50
Notebook 63 [This Notebook is missing from the microfilmed sequence.] However, the first page of John Rave's Peyote Experience at Winnebago I, #1, is labeled with a large "63" in the upper left corner.
-
Notebook 64 Whiskey Making. [Note: “Gives some details about Jasper. Imp’t”]. Phonetic text with interlinear translation.
17-30
Notebook 65 Jasper Blowsnake’s Account of Initiation into the Medicine Dance.
-
     Čapósgaga Story (incomplete, PSHSW (1915) 192-196, line 5)
     [= The Fox-Hočąk War]. Published in
WT 11-17 [English only] =
     PSHSW (1915) 192-207 [Hočąk text and English translation].
1-6
     Jasper Blowsnake’s Initiation into the Medicine Rite. Published in JAmF.
32-38
Notebook 66 War and Shamanistic Exploits. [Note: “25/11 ’47. Seven very imp’t texts. Get them ready in English version, for Bollingers.”] These texts are done in the oldest style of orthography, usually without accents or other diacritical marks.
-
     Story 1      Warbundle Origin Myth [= Šųgepaga], by Eagle Looking.
1-9
     Story 2      Brave Man, by Waterspirit Greenhorn. (Actually the story is about      Waterspirit Greenhorn (= Bluehorn).)
1-13
     Story 3      Winnebago-Sioux war against the Masxhes [ = The Masaxe War], by      John Hazen Hill.
1-7
     Story 4      Shamanistic Exploit [= The Two Children], by John Hazen Hill.
1-7
     Story 5      Myth about how Sinįhogiwega exacted vengeance against the Osage for
     rubbing out his village. [= Osage Massacre], told by Xetenišaraka = Wren
     (John Hazen Hill). Typed Winnebago, handwritten interlinear translation.
1-2
     Story 6      Big Thunder Teaches Čap’ósgaga the Warpath. Typed phonetic text with      interlinear translation. For a typed English translation, see Winnebago IV,      #8d: 1082-1087.
1-4
     Story 7      The Lame Friend [typed Winnebago, handwritten interlinear
     Translation], by John Hazen Hill.
1-4
Notebook 67 Warečawera. Jasper Blowsnake’s Version of the Twins Myth. First page missing; phonetic text with a partial interlinear translation. The following sections are marked only in the Hočąk Encyclopedia:
1-41
     The Birth of the Twins
1-12
     The Twins Disobey Their Father
13-30
     The Twins Get into Hot Water
30-31
     The Father of the Twins Attempts to Flee
31-35
     The Twins Visit Their Father's Village
35-37
     The Lost Blanket
37-39
     Earthmaker Sends Rušewe to the Twins
39-41
Notebook 68 War Exploit [= White Thunder's Warpath], by John Hazen Hill. Typed phonetic text with interlinear translation.
1-4
Notebook 69 Sore-Eye Dance (Hišjaxiri Waši). Published in WT 281-295. Phonetic text with an interlinear translation, written in a clear hand in ink. For a syllabic text with an interlinear translation, see Notebook 23.
1-37
     Battle of the Night Blessed Men and the Medicine Rite Men (WT 295)
36-37
Notebook 70 XXXVI. The Chief’s Daughter and the Orphan [= The Resurrection of the Chief's Daughter], by Charlie Houghton. Interlinear phonetic text. Published in JAmF (also interlinear). For another text, see Winnebago III, #11a: 141-223.
1-52
Notebook 71      Fasting Experience, by Albert Hensley. Published in PMP.
1-15
     John Baptiste's account of a man who joined the circus and traveled to      England, then was converted to the peyote church. Very clear handwritten      phonetic text and interlinear translation.
1-4
     The Seer, by R. F. Phonetic text with an interlinear English translation      written in pencil and often hard to read. Published in PMP 196-199. For a      phonetic text only, see Winnebago III, #19e: 1-5.
1-7
Notebook 72 Worúxega, by R. W. Phonetic text with a partial interlinear translation.
1-16
Notebook 73 Incorrectly labeled, "War Customs", a title more appropriate to the next notebook. Phonetic text with an interlinear translation. This is the Bird Clan Origin Myth.
1-5
Notebook 74 War Bundle Feast of Thunder-Bird Clan, etc.
-
     Victory Dance (Wakje Waši). An account of the steps of the warpath      culminating in the Victory Dance. Phonetic text with an interlinear
     English translation.
1-10
     Warbundle Feast of Thunderbird Clan, by Sam Blowsnake. Published in      WT, 486-499. Phonetic text only. For the syllabic text see Winnebago V,      #20. (?)
1-31
Notebook 75 Hunting Customs. Phonetic texts with interlinear English translations. Published in PMP. However, cf. WT, 65-66.
1-15
     Bear hunting.
1-6
     Preparing corn.
6-7
     Deer hunting.
8-11
     Buffalo hunting.
11-15
Notebook 76 Chief’s Dance, by Jasper Blowsnake. Phonetic text with an interlinear English translation. Published in WT.
1-6
Notebook 77 Thunderbird Clan Privileges and Taboos, the Four Night’s Wake of the Thunderbird Clan. Published in WT, 98-100. Phonetic texts with interlinear English translations.
-
     Thunderbird Clan Origin Myth [Version 7]. Has the initials "J. F." [John      Fireman ?]. The customs associated with fire and the chief in the Thunder      Clan.
1-4
     Origin and sacred possessions of the Bear Clan.
4-4a†
     Origin and sacred possessions of the Wolf Clan.
5
     III. Four Nights Wake of the Thunderbird Clan. For another phonetic text,      see Winnebago III, #3, 99-102.
1-23
     a. Description of Wake
1-6, 14-18
     b. Address to the Spirit on the First Night
6-11
           Journey to Spiritland, Thunderbird Clan (Journey to Spiritland, version           1a). For another phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #3, 99-102.
7-11
     c. Second Version: IV. Four Nights Wake of the Thunderbird Clan. For      another phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #3, 102-107.

11-13,
18-21

           Journey to Spiritland, Thunderbird Clan (Journey to Spiritland, version           1b). For another phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #3, 103-107.
11-13s,
18-21‡
     d. Beliefs about the Soul. Interlinear text to "Beliefs Concerning Ghosts".      For another phonetic text, see Winnebago III, #3, 107-109.
22-23
Notebook 78 Hokixere Dance. Phonetic text with an interlinear English translation. Published in WT, 331-335.
1-23
Notebook 79 Ghost Dance [= Ghost Dance Origin Myth I]. Phonetic text with an interlinear English translation. Added Note: “not published, RG”.
1-5
*there are two pages numbered "23".
†page 4a follows page 4.
‡before the end of page 13, the text is continued on pages 19-21, after which it resumes from 13-14.

Sources:

Blair, The Indian Tribes = Emma Helen Blair, The Indian Tribes of the Upper Mississippi Valley and Region of the Great Lakes, 2 vols. (Norman, Oklahoma: The Arthur H. Clark Company, 1911) Volume I, Volume II.

CT = Sam Blowsnake, Crashing Thunder: The Autobiography of an American Indian, Paul Radin, ed. (New York and London: Appleton and Co., l926).

CW = Paul Radin, The Culture of the Winnebago: As Defined by Themselves, International Journal of American Linguistics, Memoirs, 3 (1950).

JAmF = Journal of American Folklore.

PMP = Paul Radin, Primitive Man as Philosopher (New York: D. Appleton Co., 1927).

PSHSW = Proceedings of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin (Madison: State Historical Society of Wisconsin).

RL&D= Paul Radin, The Road of Life and Death: A Ritual Drama of the American Indians. Bollingen Series V (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1973 [1945]).

Tr = Paul Radin, The Trickster: A Study in American Indian Mythology (New York: Schocken Books, 1956).

WHC = Paul Radin, Winnebago Hero Cycles: A Study in Aboriginal Literature (Baltimore: Waverly Press, 1948).

WT = Paul Radin, The Winnebago Tribe (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1990 [1923]).


Index

| Reel 8 | Radin's Winnebago Phonetic Stem Dictionary (The Radin Lexical File) | Winnebago I, #1 | Winnebago I, #2 | Winnebago I, #3 | Reel 9 | Winnebago I, #4 | Winnebago I, #5 | Winnebago I, #6 | Winnebago I, # 7a | Winnebago I, #7b | Winnebago I, #7c | Winnebago I, #7d | Winnebago I, #7e | Winnebago I, #7f | Winnebago I, #8 | Winnebago II, #1 | Winnebago II, #2 | Winnebago II, #3 | Winnebago II, #4 | Winnebago II, #5 | Reel 10 | Winnebago II, #6 | Winnebago II, #7 | Winnebago III, #1 | Winnebago III, #2 | Winnebago III, #3 | Winnebago III, #4 | Winnebago III, #5 | Winnebago III, #6 | Winnebago III, #7 | Winnebago III, #8 | Winnebago III, #9 | Winnebago III, #10 | Winnebago III, #11a | Winnebago III, 11b | Winnebago III, #12 | Reel 11 | Winnebago III, #13 | Winnebago III, #14 | Winnebago III, #15 | Winnebago III, #16 | Winnebago III, #17 | Winnebago III, #18 | Winnebago III, #19a | Winnbago III, #19b | Winnebago III, #19c | Winnebago III, #19d | Winnebago III, #19e | Winnebago IV, #1 | Winnebago IV, #2 | Winnebago IV, #3 | Winnebago IV, #4 | Winnebago IV, #5 | Winnebago IV, #6 | Winnebago IV, #7 | Winnebago IV, #8a | Winnebago IV, #8b-z | Winnebago IV, #9 | Reel 6b | Winnebago V, #1 | Winnebago V, #2 | Winnebago V, #3 | Winnebago V, #4 | Winnebago V, #5 | Winnebago V, #6 | Winnebago V, #7 | Winnebago V, #8 | Reel 6a | Winnebago V, #9 | Winnebago V, #10 | Winnebago V, #11 | Winnebago V, #12 | Winnebago V, #13 | Winnebago V, #14 | Winnebago V, #15 | Winnebago V, #16 | Winnebago V, #17 | Winnebago V, #18 | Winnebago V, #19 | Winnebago V, #20 | Winnebago V, #21 | Winnebago V, #22 | Winnebago V, #23 | Winnebago V, #24 | Reel 12 | Notebooks 1-19 | Reel 13 | Notebooks 20-52 | Reel 14 | Notebooks 53-79 | Sources |